Monday, November 22, 2010

worksheet lesson on bugs/arthropods

Research Information

Name ___________________________________________
DATE ______________


Name of insect: __________________________________

DEFINITIONS- KEY WORDS

ARTHRO POD ARTHROPOD










What does your insect
look like?
Where does your insect
live?
What does your insect
eat?
What other interesting
facts did you find about
your insect?

Size
Area and range Food



Appearance
Habitat



http://dictionary.factmonster.com/
DEFINITIONS- KEY WORDS

ARTHRO POD ARTHROPOD
ARTHRITIS
ARTHRITIC POD CEPHALOPOD
PODIATRIST
PED MO-PED
PEDAL CENTIPEDE
JOINT FOOT


a combining form meaning “joint,” “jointed,” used in the formation of compound words: arthropod. Also, esp. before a vowel,arthr-. a combining form meaning “one having a foot” of the kind or number specified by the initial element; often corresponding to Neo-Latin class names ending in -poda, with -pod used in English to name a single member of such a class: cephalopod. Cf. -ped. Pronunciation: (är'thru-pod"), [key]—n.
any invertebrate of the phylum Arthropoda, having a segmented body, jointed limbs, and usually a chitinous shell that undergoes moltings, including the insects, spiders and other arachnids, crustaceans, and myriapods. —adj. Also,ar•throp•o•dalPronunciation: (är-throp'u-dl), [key] ar•throp•o•dan Pronunciation: (är-throp'u-dn), [key] ar•throp•o•dous Pronunciation: (är-throp'u-dus). [key]belonging or pertaining to the Arthropoda.

ARTHROPODS ()
Centipedes, millipedes, insects, crustaceans, and arachnids, including spiders, all belong to a super-group of invertebrates called arthropods. Arthro

ARTHROPODS
WHAT FEATURES DO ARTHROPODS SHARE?
WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CENTIPEDE AND A MILLIPEDE?
DO ALL CENTIPEDES HAVE ONE HUNDRED LEGS?
ARTHROPOD CLASSIFICATION
EXOSKELETON
Centipedes, millipedes, insects, crustaceans, and arachnids, including spiders, all belong to a super-group of invertebrates called arthropods. Arthropods are more numerous and varied than any other animal group.

WHAT FEATURES DO ARTHROPODS SHARE?
All arthropods have bodies divided into segments and covered with a hard EXOSKELETON. This tough casing is made of a protein called chitin, which is also found in human fingernails. The armor is flexible at joints on the legs, which makes arthropods nimble.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CENTIPEDE AND A MILLIPEDE?
Centipedes are active hunters, while most millipedes eat plant matter. Also, centipedes have two legs per body segment. Millipedes have four. Centipedes and millipedes are collectively known as myriapods.

DO ALL CENTIPEDES HAVE ONE HUNDRED LEGS?
The word centipede means “100 legs,” but some centipedes have fewer than 100 legs, and others have more. Similarly, the word millipede means “1,000 legs,” but in fact no millipede has more than 750 legs.

ARTHROPOD CLASSIFICATION
Arthropods make up the largest phylum (group) in the animal kingdom. There are more than 900,000 named species divided into 13 classes:

Crustaceans
Insects
Arachnids
Centipedes
Millipedes
Sea spiders
Pauropods
Symphylans
Springtails
Proturans
Two-pronged bristletails
Three-pronged bristletails
King crabs


EXOSKELETON
An arthropod’s exoskeleton is a protective case and an anchor point for muscles. As well as being tough, it is waterproof, helping these creatures to survive in even the harshest habitats.


The lobster’s hard exoskeleton supports and protects its body. Even delicate parts, such as the legs and antennae, are completely encased. The North Atlantic lobster is the world’s heaviest arthropod, weighing up to 44 lb (20 kg).
HOW DO ARTHROPODS GROW?
In order to grow, arthropods have to molt (shed their exoskeletons) every so often. They then expand their bodies before their new casing hardens. Arthropods are vulnerable while molting, so they look for a safe place to hide before they begin.

WHERE DO ARTHROPODS LIVE?
Arthropods occur in virtually every habitat, from the cold ocean depths to the hottest deserts. They can live through extremes that would kill most vertebrates. Scorpions, for example, can survive being frozen solid.
BEETLES


beetle, common name for insects of the order Coleoptera, which, with more than 300,000 described species,
1. is the largest of the insect orders.
2. Beetles are classified in the phylum Arthropoda, class Insecta, order Coleoptera.
3. Beetles have :
4. chewing mouthparts and
5. well-developed antennae.
6. They are characterized by :
7. a front pair of hard, opaque, waterproof wings called elytra, which usually meet in a straight line down the middle of the back. The elytra cover the rear pair of membranous flight wings, protecting them and the body from mechanical damage and desiccation.
8. Beetles are :
9. poor flyers
10. compared with many other insects,
11. GREAT SURVIVORS, but they are well adapted for surviving rigorous conditions.
12. They are found everywhere except in oceans and near the poles, and they occupy nearly every kind of habitat. Most are terrestrial, but some are underground tunnelers and some live in water. These water beetles are often confused with water bugs, but the latter all have sucking mouthparts. Beetles range in size from under 1/32 in. (1 mm) to over 6 in. (15 cm) long; tropical species are the largest. Most are dull, but members of several beetle families are brilliantly colored, some with a metallic or iridescent sheen. The majority of beetles are plant eaters, but there are also many predators and scavengers and a few parasites. Many beetles are highly destructive pests of crops and gardens (e.g., Japanese beetle, potato beetle, boll weevil), but others are beneficial predators of harmful insects (e.g., ladybird beetles). The largest of the many beetle families is the scarab beetle family, with over 20,000 species; among these are the dung beetles, which are invaluable scavengers. Weevils are plant-eating beetles with mouthparts elongated into snouts bearing jaws at their ends. The fireflies are luminescent beetles. Blister beetles, including the so-called Spanish fly, produce irritating secretions.
13.
14.
15. click beetle, common name for members of the widespread beetle family Elateridae. Also called elater beetle,
16. the click beetle has a hinge across the front of the body that allows it to flex, and a spine-and-groove arrangement on the underside of the body that provides a snapping mechanism.
17. When a click beetle is turned on its back it cannot right itself by rolling onto its short legs.
18. It arches its body upward so that only the ends touch the ground, then straightens suddenly, causing the spine to slide into the groove.
19. This sends the beetle spinning through the air and produces a loud click.
20. If the beetle lands on its back again it repeats the performance. A click beetle also snaps its body when it is picked up, which may cause the predator to drop it.
21. Click beetles have long, flat bodies, generally rectangular, but curved at the ends.
22. They range in length from 1/4 in. to 4 in. (6.4–102 mm); most are black or brown.
23. Most adults are nocturnal leaf-eaters. The larvae, called wireworms, are destructive to a large variety of plants. Some tropical click beetles are brilliantly luminescent.
24. Click beetles are classified in the phylum Arthropoda, class Insecta, order Coleoptera, family Elateridae.
25. There are other luminescent insects, including members of other beetle families; the most spectacular are found in the click beetle family.
26. Fireflies are classified in the phylum Arthropoda, class Insecta, order Coleoptera, family Lampyridae.

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