Monday, November 22, 2010

Aim or Behavioral Objective: Students will identify and will be able to (SWBAT):
1. Define the three body parts of an insect.
2. Identify any specific body part when given a diagram.
3. Research different facts about insect.

Applicable N.Y.S Learning Standard(s) (http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/nysatl/standards.html):
English Language Arts: S.1 Language for Information and Understanding; S.2 Language for Literary
Response and Expression; S.3 Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation. Science: S.2

Motivation: The teacher read the story Bustling Beetles by Peter Murray. He asks the students to share
any prior/background knowledge about insects/bugs. Class recently celebrated William T. Davis’ birthday,
a famous entomologist who the school is named after. Students will be learning about insects throughout
the various subjects.
Review and Link with Prior Knowledge: The teacher asked the students to think and share about what they
know about insects. The class brainstormed many ideas, as the teacher recorded the students’ responses on a
kid- friendly chart.
Explanation and Demonstration of Rules and Procedures:
Session 1
Teacher has students sit at rug. He then read a selected book and then elicited from students certain facts
about bugs. (Has anyone ever seen a bug? What would happen if you had 4 legs? 6 legs?)
Teacher showed a creative, kid-friendly HTA chart (Head Thorax Abdomen chart) and begins chant with
a familiar tune. Head, Thorax, Abdomen, 2x . 2 eyes, 2 antenna, 6 legs from its thorax, Head, Thorax,
Abdomen (to the tune of “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes”).
Teacher then hands out a bug sheet from teacher website and children label diagram: Head ,Thorax, and Abdomen.
Review.
Now we will create our own bug.
Give out separate parts for children to color (labeled a-b-c) (5 minutes).
Then children will be then be asked to trade one or two specifically labeled parts with their neighbor.
Students will assemble their new bug on a sheet of construction paper and name their special bug.
Medial Summaries: The teacher asks the students at their desks to repeat the chant as they label/mark up their diagrams. Students will be chosen randomly to share their facts and asked to reinforce knowledge by repeating the learned chant about the three body parts.

Opportunities for Practice: The students were then asked to create our own bug. Teacher handed out separate parts for children to color (labeled a-b-c) (5 minutes). Children were asked to trade one or two specifically labeled parts with their neighbor.Students assembled their new bug on a sheet of construction paper and named their special bug.
Students will continue lesson in Session 2 and do further research on a specific insect.

Session 2

Review, Further Research and Share Aloud
Review body parts and facts from previous session.

1. Distribute various books about insects to each group.
2. Have students take turns reading their book about insects.
3. Handout worksheets to each group. Be sure to have students fill out the chart.
4. When all groups are finished, have them share aloud, about what they learned.





Aim or Behavioral Objective: Students will identify and will be able to (SWBAT):
1. Define the three body parts of an insect.
2. Identify any specific body part when given a diagram.
3. Research different facts about insect.

Applicable N.Y.S Learning Standard(s) (http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/nysatl/standards.html):
English Language Arts: S.1 Language for Information and Understanding; S.2 Language for Literary
Response and Expression; S.3 Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation. Science: S.2

Motivation: The teacher previously read the story Bustling Beetles by Peter Murray. He asks the students to share
any prior/background knowledge about insects/bugs. Class recently celebrated William T. Davis’ birthday,
a famous entomologist who the school is named after. Students will be learning about insects throughout
the various subjects.
Review and Link with Prior Knowledge: The teacher asked the students to think and share about what they
know about insects. The class brainstormed many ideas, as the teacher recorded the students’ responses on a
kid- friendly chart.
Explanation and Demonstration of Rules and Procedures:
In Session 1, Students brainstormed prior knowledge about insects as teacher recorded the responses. T
Teacher has students sit at rug. He then read a selected book and then elicited from students certain facts
about bugs. (Has anyone ever seen a bug? What would happen if you had 4 legs? 6 legs?)
Teacher showed a creative, kid-friendly HTA chart (Head Thorax Abdomen chart) and begins chant with
a familiar tune. Head, Thorax, Abdomen, 2x . 2 eyes, 2 antenna, 6 legs from its thorax, Head, Thorax,
Abdomen (to the tune of “Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes”).
Teacher also had children return to their desks to label diagram and to color and create their own unique bug while identifying the Head, Thorax, and Abdomen.
In Session 2, class will be doing research on a specific insect.
Students will :
Review, Do Further Research and Share Aloud
Review body parts and facts from previous session.
Teacher will:
1. Distribute various books about insects to each group.
2. Have students take turns reading their book about insects.
3. Handout worksheets to each group. Be sure to have students fill out the chart.
4. When all groups are finished, have them share aloud, about what they learned.

Medial Summaries: The teacher asks the students at their desks to repeat the chant as they label/mark up their diagrams. Students will be chosen randomly to share their facts and asked to reinforce knowledge by repeating the learned chant about the three body parts, In addition, they will share the information that they have periodically.

Opportunities for Practice:
Session 2 is all about practice. Students are not only identifying the parts of their own insect but finding
additional facts to share with their peers.

Final Summary: The teacher reviewed what the class learned through the process of a share aloud.
Assessment of Understanding: Students were asked NOT ONLY the body parts of an insect but additional
facts that they researched. The teacher judged their understanding based on their responses.
Class Management: The first lesson was conducted on the rug. Students were expected to participate by
raising their hand to respond to questions or comments. Students then transitioned to their desks for
independent work. They returned to the rug to share their findings. The second lesson includes class review
and includes some independent and group work. Teachers will monitor and praise positive work.

Comments on Lesson and Related Matters: The students used picture clues ,and a repetitive song/chant to a
childhood song to reinforce their understanding of the body parts of each insect.
The teacher emphasized the singing of the song as the children completed their assignments at their desks .
This was very helpful to the success of this lesson.

lesson - ela- geisel- wacky wed- differences/ blends/digraph/rhyme/song/rap

WACKY WEDNESDAY

• It all began with that shoe on the WALL - A shoe on the WALL …? Shouldn’t be there at all!
• Then I looked up and I said “ OH, MAN!” and that’s how WACKY WEDNESDAY began.
• I looked out the WINDOW and I said, “ GEE!” More things WERE WACKY! And I saw three(3).
• In the bathroom MORE! In the bathroom, FOUR(4)!
• I began to dress. Then I said WOW! Four (4) more things WERE WACKY now!
• I looked in the kitchen. I said “By cracky!” Five (5) more things are very WACKY!”
• I was late for school I started along and I saw that six (6) more things were wrong.
• And then Seven (7) more!
• And the Sutherland sisters! They looked WACKY, too. They said, “Nothing is WACKY around here but you!”
• “But look“ I yelled. “ Eight (8) things are WRONG here at school.”
• I ran into school. I yelled to Miss Bass….. Look! 9 things are WACKY right here in your class!”
• Nothing is WACKY here in my class! Get out! You’re the WACKY one! “ Out!” said Miss Bass.
• I went out the school door. Things WERE WORSE than before. I couldn’t believe it. Ten (10) WACKY things more!
• Then I counted Eleven (11).
• Then twelve (12) WORSE things! I got scared. And I ran. I ran and knocked over Patrolman McGann.
• “I’m sorry, Patrolman.” That’s all I could say, Don’t be sorry,” he smiled. “It’s that kind of day. But be glad! WACKY WEDNESDAY will soon go away!”
• “ Only twenty (20) things more WILL be WACKY,” he said. “ Just find them and then you can go back to bed.”
• WACKY WEDNESDAY WAS gone WHEN I counted them all. And I even got rid of that shoe on the WALL.

worksheet lesson on bugs/arthropods

Research Information

Name ___________________________________________
DATE ______________


Name of insect: __________________________________

DEFINITIONS- KEY WORDS

ARTHRO POD ARTHROPOD










What does your insect
look like?
Where does your insect
live?
What does your insect
eat?
What other interesting
facts did you find about
your insect?

Size
Area and range Food



Appearance
Habitat



http://dictionary.factmonster.com/
DEFINITIONS- KEY WORDS

ARTHRO POD ARTHROPOD
ARTHRITIS
ARTHRITIC POD CEPHALOPOD
PODIATRIST
PED MO-PED
PEDAL CENTIPEDE
JOINT FOOT


a combining form meaning “joint,” “jointed,” used in the formation of compound words: arthropod. Also, esp. before a vowel,arthr-. a combining form meaning “one having a foot” of the kind or number specified by the initial element; often corresponding to Neo-Latin class names ending in -poda, with -pod used in English to name a single member of such a class: cephalopod. Cf. -ped. Pronunciation: (är'thru-pod"), [key]—n.
any invertebrate of the phylum Arthropoda, having a segmented body, jointed limbs, and usually a chitinous shell that undergoes moltings, including the insects, spiders and other arachnids, crustaceans, and myriapods. —adj. Also,ar•throp•o•dalPronunciation: (är-throp'u-dl), [key] ar•throp•o•dan Pronunciation: (är-throp'u-dn), [key] ar•throp•o•dous Pronunciation: (är-throp'u-dus). [key]belonging or pertaining to the Arthropoda.

ARTHROPODS ()
Centipedes, millipedes, insects, crustaceans, and arachnids, including spiders, all belong to a super-group of invertebrates called arthropods. Arthro

ARTHROPODS
WHAT FEATURES DO ARTHROPODS SHARE?
WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CENTIPEDE AND A MILLIPEDE?
DO ALL CENTIPEDES HAVE ONE HUNDRED LEGS?
ARTHROPOD CLASSIFICATION
EXOSKELETON
Centipedes, millipedes, insects, crustaceans, and arachnids, including spiders, all belong to a super-group of invertebrates called arthropods. Arthropods are more numerous and varied than any other animal group.

WHAT FEATURES DO ARTHROPODS SHARE?
All arthropods have bodies divided into segments and covered with a hard EXOSKELETON. This tough casing is made of a protein called chitin, which is also found in human fingernails. The armor is flexible at joints on the legs, which makes arthropods nimble.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CENTIPEDE AND A MILLIPEDE?
Centipedes are active hunters, while most millipedes eat plant matter. Also, centipedes have two legs per body segment. Millipedes have four. Centipedes and millipedes are collectively known as myriapods.

DO ALL CENTIPEDES HAVE ONE HUNDRED LEGS?
The word centipede means “100 legs,” but some centipedes have fewer than 100 legs, and others have more. Similarly, the word millipede means “1,000 legs,” but in fact no millipede has more than 750 legs.

ARTHROPOD CLASSIFICATION
Arthropods make up the largest phylum (group) in the animal kingdom. There are more than 900,000 named species divided into 13 classes:

Crustaceans
Insects
Arachnids
Centipedes
Millipedes
Sea spiders
Pauropods
Symphylans
Springtails
Proturans
Two-pronged bristletails
Three-pronged bristletails
King crabs


EXOSKELETON
An arthropod’s exoskeleton is a protective case and an anchor point for muscles. As well as being tough, it is waterproof, helping these creatures to survive in even the harshest habitats.


The lobster’s hard exoskeleton supports and protects its body. Even delicate parts, such as the legs and antennae, are completely encased. The North Atlantic lobster is the world’s heaviest arthropod, weighing up to 44 lb (20 kg).
HOW DO ARTHROPODS GROW?
In order to grow, arthropods have to molt (shed their exoskeletons) every so often. They then expand their bodies before their new casing hardens. Arthropods are vulnerable while molting, so they look for a safe place to hide before they begin.

WHERE DO ARTHROPODS LIVE?
Arthropods occur in virtually every habitat, from the cold ocean depths to the hottest deserts. They can live through extremes that would kill most vertebrates. Scorpions, for example, can survive being frozen solid.
BEETLES


beetle, common name for insects of the order Coleoptera, which, with more than 300,000 described species,
1. is the largest of the insect orders.
2. Beetles are classified in the phylum Arthropoda, class Insecta, order Coleoptera.
3. Beetles have :
4. chewing mouthparts and
5. well-developed antennae.
6. They are characterized by :
7. a front pair of hard, opaque, waterproof wings called elytra, which usually meet in a straight line down the middle of the back. The elytra cover the rear pair of membranous flight wings, protecting them and the body from mechanical damage and desiccation.
8. Beetles are :
9. poor flyers
10. compared with many other insects,
11. GREAT SURVIVORS, but they are well adapted for surviving rigorous conditions.
12. They are found everywhere except in oceans and near the poles, and they occupy nearly every kind of habitat. Most are terrestrial, but some are underground tunnelers and some live in water. These water beetles are often confused with water bugs, but the latter all have sucking mouthparts. Beetles range in size from under 1/32 in. (1 mm) to over 6 in. (15 cm) long; tropical species are the largest. Most are dull, but members of several beetle families are brilliantly colored, some with a metallic or iridescent sheen. The majority of beetles are plant eaters, but there are also many predators and scavengers and a few parasites. Many beetles are highly destructive pests of crops and gardens (e.g., Japanese beetle, potato beetle, boll weevil), but others are beneficial predators of harmful insects (e.g., ladybird beetles). The largest of the many beetle families is the scarab beetle family, with over 20,000 species; among these are the dung beetles, which are invaluable scavengers. Weevils are plant-eating beetles with mouthparts elongated into snouts bearing jaws at their ends. The fireflies are luminescent beetles. Blister beetles, including the so-called Spanish fly, produce irritating secretions.
13.
14.
15. click beetle, common name for members of the widespread beetle family Elateridae. Also called elater beetle,
16. the click beetle has a hinge across the front of the body that allows it to flex, and a spine-and-groove arrangement on the underside of the body that provides a snapping mechanism.
17. When a click beetle is turned on its back it cannot right itself by rolling onto its short legs.
18. It arches its body upward so that only the ends touch the ground, then straightens suddenly, causing the spine to slide into the groove.
19. This sends the beetle spinning through the air and produces a loud click.
20. If the beetle lands on its back again it repeats the performance. A click beetle also snaps its body when it is picked up, which may cause the predator to drop it.
21. Click beetles have long, flat bodies, generally rectangular, but curved at the ends.
22. They range in length from 1/4 in. to 4 in. (6.4–102 mm); most are black or brown.
23. Most adults are nocturnal leaf-eaters. The larvae, called wireworms, are destructive to a large variety of plants. Some tropical click beetles are brilliantly luminescent.
24. Click beetles are classified in the phylum Arthropoda, class Insecta, order Coleoptera, family Elateridae.
25. There are other luminescent insects, including members of other beetle families; the most spectacular are found in the click beetle family.
26. Fireflies are classified in the phylum Arthropoda, class Insecta, order Coleoptera, family Lampyridae.

arthropod lesson - worksheet - meet the beetles

Research Information

Name ___________________________________________
DATE ______________


Name of insect: __________________________________

DEFINITIONS- KEY WORDS

ARTHRO POD ARTHROPOD










What does your insect
look like?
Where does your insect
live?
What does your insect
eat?
What other interesting
facts did you find about
your insect?

Size
Area and range Food



Appearance
Habitat



http://dictionary.factmonster.com/
DEFINITIONS- KEY WORDS

ARTHRO POD ARTHROPOD
ARTHRITIS
ARTHRITIC POD CEPHALOPOD
PODIATRIST
PED MO-PED
PEDAL CENTIPEDE
JOINT FOOT


a combining form meaning “joint,” “jointed,” used in the formation of compound words: arthropod. Also, esp. before a vowel,arthr-. a combining form meaning “one having a foot” of the kind or number specified by the initial element; often corresponding to Neo-Latin class names ending in -poda, with -pod used in English to name a single member of such a class: cephalopod. Cf. -ped. Pronunciation: (är'thru-pod"), [key]—n.
any invertebrate of the phylum Arthropoda, having a segmented body, jointed limbs, and usually a chitinous shell that undergoes moltings, including the insects, spiders and other arachnids, crustaceans, and myriapods. —adj. Also,ar•throp•o•dalPronunciation: (är-throp'u-dl), [key] ar•throp•o•dan Pronunciation: (är-throp'u-dn), [key] ar•throp•o•dous Pronunciation: (är-throp'u-dus). [key]belonging or pertaining to the Arthropoda.

ARTHROPODS ()
Centipedes, millipedes, insects, crustaceans, and arachnids, including spiders, all belong to a super-group of invertebrates called arthropods. Arthro

ARTHROPODS
WHAT FEATURES DO ARTHROPODS SHARE?
WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CENTIPEDE AND A MILLIPEDE?
DO ALL CENTIPEDES HAVE ONE HUNDRED LEGS?
ARTHROPOD CLASSIFICATION
EXOSKELETON
Centipedes, millipedes, insects, crustaceans, and arachnids, including spiders, all belong to a super-group of invertebrates called arthropods. Arthropods are more numerous and varied than any other animal group.

WHAT FEATURES DO ARTHROPODS SHARE?
All arthropods have bodies divided into segments and covered with a hard EXOSKELETON. This tough casing is made of a protein called chitin, which is also found in human fingernails. The armor is flexible at joints on the legs, which makes arthropods nimble.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CENTIPEDE AND A MILLIPEDE?
Centipedes are active hunters, while most millipedes eat plant matter. Also, centipedes have two legs per body segment. Millipedes have four. Centipedes and millipedes are collectively known as myriapods.

DO ALL CENTIPEDES HAVE ONE HUNDRED LEGS?
The word centipede means “100 legs,” but some centipedes have fewer than 100 legs, and others have more. Similarly, the word millipede means “1,000 legs,” but in fact no millipede has more than 750 legs.

ARTHROPOD CLASSIFICATION
Arthropods make up the largest phylum (group) in the animal kingdom. There are more than 900,000 named species divided into 13 classes:

Crustaceans
Insects
Arachnids
Centipedes
Millipedes
Sea spiders
Pauropods
Symphylans
Springtails
Proturans
Two-pronged bristletails
Three-pronged bristletails
King crabs


EXOSKELETON
An arthropod’s exoskeleton is a protective case and an anchor point for muscles. As well as being tough, it is waterproof, helping these creatures to survive in even the harshest habitats.


The lobster’s hard exoskeleton supports and protects its body. Even delicate parts, such as the legs and antennae, are completely encased. The North Atlantic lobster is the world’s heaviest arthropod, weighing up to 44 lb (20 kg).
HOW DO ARTHROPODS GROW?
In order to grow, arthropods have to molt (shed their exoskeletons) every so often. They then expand their bodies before their new casing hardens. Arthropods are vulnerable while molting, so they look for a safe place to hide before they begin.

WHERE DO ARTHROPODS LIVE?
Arthropods occur in virtually every habitat, from the cold ocean depths to the hottest deserts. They can live through extremes that would kill most vertebrates. Scorpions, for example, can survive being frozen solid.
BEETLES


beetle, common name for insects of the order Coleoptera, which, with more than 300,000 described species,
1. is the largest of the insect orders.
2. Beetles are classified in the phylum Arthropoda, class Insecta, order Coleoptera.
3. Beetles have :
4. chewing mouthparts and
5. well-developed antennae.
6. They are characterized by :
7. a front pair of hard, opaque, waterproof wings called elytra, which usually meet in a straight line down the middle of the back. The elytra cover the rear pair of membranous flight wings, protecting them and the body from mechanical damage and desiccation.
8. Beetles are :
9. poor flyers
10. compared with many other insects,
11. GREAT SURVIVORS, but they are well adapted for surviving rigorous conditions.
12. They are found everywhere except in oceans and near the poles, and they occupy nearly every kind of habitat. Most are terrestrial, but some are underground tunnelers and some live in water. These water beetles are often confused with water bugs, but the latter all have sucking mouthparts. Beetles range in size from under 1/32 in. (1 mm) to over 6 in. (15 cm) long; tropical species are the largest. Most are dull, but members of several beetle families are brilliantly colored, some with a metallic or iridescent sheen. The majority of beetles are plant eaters, but there are also many predators and scavengers and a few parasites. Many beetles are highly destructive pests of crops and gardens (e.g., Japanese beetle, potato beetle, boll weevil), but others are beneficial predators of harmful insects (e.g., ladybird beetles). The largest of the many beetle families is the scarab beetle family, with over 20,000 species; among these are the dung beetles, which are invaluable scavengers. Weevils are plant-eating beetles with mouthparts elongated into snouts bearing jaws at their ends. The fireflies are luminescent beetles. Blister beetles, including the so-called Spanish fly, produce irritating secretions.
13.
14.
15. click beetle, common name for members of the widespread beetle family Elateridae. Also called elater beetle,
16. the click beetle has a hinge across the front of the body that allows it to flex, and a spine-and-groove arrangement on the underside of the body that provides a snapping mechanism.
17. When a click beetle is turned on its back it cannot right itself by rolling onto its short legs.
18. It arches its body upward so that only the ends touch the ground, then straightens suddenly, causing the spine to slide into the groove.
19. This sends the beetle spinning through the air and produces a loud click.
20. If the beetle lands on its back again it repeats the performance. A click beetle also snaps its body when it is picked up, which may cause the predator to drop it.
21. Click beetles have long, flat bodies, generally rectangular, but curved at the ends.
22. They range in length from 1/4 in. to 4 in. (6.4–102 mm); most are black or brown.
23. Most adults are nocturnal leaf-eaters. The larvae, called wireworms, are destructive to a large variety of plants. Some tropical click beetles are brilliantly luminescent.
24. Click beetles are classified in the phylum Arthropoda, class Insecta, order Coleoptera, family Elateridae.
25. There are other luminescent insects, including members of other beetle families; the most spectacular are found in the click beetle family.
26. Fireflies are classified in the phylum Arthropoda, class Insecta, order Coleoptera, family Lampyridae.