Monday, January 25, 2010

Lesson Plan

Action Factor, Inc. “Sing Your Way Through Phonics
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Ready to Read! Music Sample Rhyme in Time (Teacher’s Voice)
Listen to Rhyme in Time
Song: Rhyme in Time
Tune: “Worried Man Blues”
Concept: Rhyming words
Objective: Students will learn to recognize rhyming words by their sound as they occur in sentences, poetry, and songs.

*Practice this song plus nursery rhymes and other simple poems, omitting the rhyming words for students to supply. (Ex. Hickory Dickory ____; the mouse ran up the _____.)

For more details check out the “Rhyme in Time” phonics lesson plan.

When I hear words that rhyme
I always tap in time.
And if you agree, just tap along with me.
So listen for the rhyming
And be quick about your timing,
Singing trumpety-ah, tra-la la loo.
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“Tongue Tangle” (Teacher’s Voice)
Song: Tongue Tangle
Tune: “Potatoes”
Concept: Alliteration (words that start with the same sound)
Objective: Students will recognize alliterative words by their sound as they occur in sentences, poetry, and songs.

*Have a scavenger hunt to look for objects or pictures around the room that begin with a designated letter. Example: h=house, head.

Tongue Tangle

 Cathy Casey cracked a couple of cups of creamy coffee.
 Terry Topper tipped a ton of tangled twisted toffee.
 Words that start the same are fun to sing and say them quick,
 So, better get your tongue in shape
 Or it will surely stick!
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Volume 1 Music Sample Spelling Families (Teacher’s Voice)
Listen to Spelling Families audio sample in either Real Audio or MP3 format.
Teaching Suggestions Booklet Sample

Song: Spelling Families
Tune: “Billy Boy”
Concept: Short Vowel Spelling Patterns
Objective: Students will learn to recognize short vowel spelling patterns and families of rhyming words.

After the basic song has been learned, use the instrumental version of the song and the Mini-Chart templates to substitute other short vowel word families.
Examples: cap/map/nap, hen/pen/ten, fit/pit/sit, dog/fog/log, gum/hum/sum.
*Use the instrumental version of the song to practice spelling patterns for r-controlled vowels.

Examples: bar/far/jar, car/tar/star.

For more details check out the “Spelling Families” phonics lesson plan.
Volume 1
Mini-Chart Sample

Lyrics Sample Spelling Families Verse 1

 C-a-t That spells cat.
 B-a-t That spells bat.
 R-a-t That spells rat.
 They go together.
 For the spelling families
 Help me spell my words with ease.
 Change the first part
 But keep the ending letters.
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Volume 1 Music Sample What’s That Sound? (Teacher’s Voice)
Song: What’s That Sound?
Tune: “Jingle Bells”
Concept: Letter/Sound Correspondence (consonants)
Objective: Students will practice vocalizing the sounds associated with the consonant letters.

*After the basic song has been learned, use the instrumental version of the song and the Mini-Chart templates to change the order in which consonants are presented. Examples: Verse 1—z, h, j. Verse 2—p, b, g. Verse 3—n, d, r. Verse 4—y, q, v. Verse 5—m, f, l. Verse 6—w, t, s.

*Sing the song as a partner song with one group singing the questions and the other singing the answers.

Mini-Chart Sample
Lyrics Sample What’s That Sound?
Verse 1

/b-b-b/ What’s that sound?
That’s the letter b.
/d-d-d/ What’s that sound?
That’s the letter d.
/f-f-f/ What’s that sound?
That’s the letter f.
Oh, what fun it is to sing
Our letter sounds this way!
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Volume 2 Music Sample Contraction Action (Teacher’s Voice)
Teaching Suggestions Booklet Sample

Song: Contraction Action
Tune: “When Johnny Comes Marching Home”
Concept: Contraction Formation
Objective: Students will learn and apply the rules for forming contractions.

*After the basic song has been learned, use the instrumental version of the song and the Mini-Chart templates to substitute other contractions.

Examples: I am/I’m, you are/you’re, he is/he’s, we are/we’re, they are/they’re, it is/it’s.

*Play a Bingo game in which the caller states two words and the players cover up the squares with the contractions for those two words.

*Sing the song as a partner song with one group singing the questions and the other singing the answers.

“Contraction Action” Volume 2
Contraction Action Verse 1 & Refrain

When did not becomes a single word,
It’s didn’t, it’s didn’t.
When do not becomes a single word,
It’s don’t, it’s don’t.
Just put’em together and leave out the o.
That is where the apostrophe goes
And contraction action
Ever goes marching on
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Volume 2 Music Sample The Right Diphthong (Teacher’s Voice)
Song: The Right Diphthong
Tune: “If You’re Happy and You Know It”
Concept: Diphthong Spelling Patterns
Objective: Students will learn the spelling patterns and sounds associated with the diphthongs ou, ow, oi, and oy.

*After the basic song has been learned, use the instrumental version of the song and the Mini-Chart templates to substitute other examples of each diphthong. Examples: ou—cloud, couch, pound, sound. ow—bow, brow, clown, drown. oi—broil, coil, soil, foil. oy—Lloyd, soy, boys, toys.

*Sing the song as a partner song with one group singing the questions and the other speaking the answers.

For more details check out the “The Right Diphthong” phonics lesson plan.
Volume 2
Mini-Chart Sample


Lyrics Sample The Right Diphthong
Verse 1

Can you help me spell out?
What are the vowels? o-u
Can you help me spell shout?
What are the vowels? o-u
Know the right diphthong
And you won’t spell it wrong.
What letters will you choose
For the vowels? o-u
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Volume 3 Music Sample

There Is No K In Christmas
http://www.actionfactor.com/pages/lesson-plans/v3.03-irregular-spellings-ch-words.html
Tune: “Comin’ Round the Mountain”
Concept: Letter/Sound Correspondence (c-h =/k/)
Objective: Students will learn to recognize and spell words in which the letter combination c-h is pronounced /k/.

*Discuss how the /k/ sound can be spelled in ways other than ch.. Examples: c in car and Atlantic, ck in quack, k in kitten and ark.

*After teaching spelling patterns in the basic song, use the instrumental version of the song and the Mini-Chart templates to substitute other words where ch is pronounced like /k/. Select words where ch is located at the beginnings, middle, and ends of words. Examples: Initial position—chaos, character, chlorine, chasm, Christy, cholesterol. Medial position—architect, mechanic, mocha, schedule, scholar, Michael. Final position—Bach, bellyache, earache, headache, heartache, Heimlich.

For more details check out “There Is No K in Christmas” phonics lesson plan.
Volume 3
There Is No K in Christmas
Verse 1

Do you hear a k in Christmas?
Yes, I do!
Do you hear a k in
School and chorus too?
But there is no k in Christmas
Or in school or in chorus,
‘Cause we use c-h to spell them—
Thought you knew.
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Volume 3 Music Sample Belongings (Teacher’s Voice)
Song: Belongings
Tune: “Down By the Riverside”
Concept: Spelling Rules—Singular and plural possessives
Objective: Students will learn the spelling rules for singular and plural possessive nouns.

*Use the instrumental version of the song and the Mini-Chart templates to replace the belongings in the song. Examples: Replace jackets with backpacks. Replace hats with bags. Replace room with book. Replace dessert with a cake. Replace house with farm. Replace fancy car with video game.

*Use the instrumental version of the song and the Mini-Chart templates to replace the owners as well as the possessions. Examples: If the spots all belong to dogs...If the squeals all belong to pigs...If the food is shared by monkeys...If a class is shared by students...If the players all own the bat.

For more details check out the “Belongings” phonics lesson plan.
Volume 3
Mini-Chart Sample


Lyrics Sample Belongings
Verse 1

If the jackets belong to boys,
That’s s-apostrophe.
That’s what we want to see,
That s-apostrophe.
If the jackets just belong to one,
Apostrophe-s is how it’s done.
That’s how it’s always done.
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Select the type of audio sample that works best for you!
Real Audio Format
Real Audio is a program that allows you to play streaming audio files directly over the Internet in near real time. If you have the RealOne player installed on your computer, just click on the Real Audio link and it will start playing in a few seconds. The basic RealOne player is available free from the real.com website. A simpler alternative player is Media Player Classic, which is available free from SourceForge.net.
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Home > Lesson Plan List > “ch-k” Words Lesson Plan

Irregular Spelling Words Lesson Plan

There Is No K In Christmas
Objectives:
Students will learn to recognize and spell sets of words in which the letters c-h are pronounced like the letter k.
Students will become familiar with spelling patterns in which the letters c-h are pronounced like the letter k.
About the Concept:
The sound /k/ is usually spelled with the letter c (as in cat), k (as in kitten), or c-k (as in duck). But the sound /k/ can also be spelled with the letters c-h. Although students may be familiar with the sound that the letters c-h represent in words like chop, teacher, and peach, they may not be accustomed to using the letters c-h to represent the beginning, middle, and ending sounds in words like Christmas, echo, and stomach. The song, There Is No K In Christmas familiarizes students with many words and spelling patterns where the sound of /k/ is represented by the letters c-h. Since many words with this spelling pattern are scientific or technical in nature, the song also serves to expand reading and writing vocabulary. When teaching spelling patterns like the variant c-h, it is helpful and motivation to use students’s names as examples (e.g., Zachary, Michael, Christy...)

Materials:
Sing Your Way Through Phonics Volume 3 CD, Tracks 5 and 6 (Listen to Real Audio or MP3 sample)
Sing Your Way Through Phonics Volume 3 Mini-Charts (pp. 25-34)
Optional: Index cards
Note: If you do not have the CD or Mini-Charts, you can still teach this singular and plural possessive lesson plan using the folk tune listed on the There Is No K In Christmas song lyrics page. You can create your own mini-charts using the words in bold print letters in each verse of the Song Lyrics.

Find out more about Sing Your Way Through Phonics products.

Procedure:

Say, “Today, we are going to practice reading and spelling words in which the sound of /k/ is spelled with the letters c-h.”
Listen to CD Track 5 (There Is No K In Christmas), pointing to the words on the Mini-Charts as they occur in the song.
Ask, “Why do singers in the song say, ’Yes, I do!’ when they are asked if they hear a k in Christmas?” (because Christmas sounds like it starts with k) “Is there a letter k in the word Christmas?” (no)
Together, read the words on Mini-Charts pp.26-27. Ask, “What letters are used to make the sound of /k/ in each of these words?”
Read the words on Mini-Charts pp.28-33 and use a dictionary or encyclopedia to look up the meanings of any unfamiliar words. Reinforce word meanings by asking, “Which words are names of people, places, or holidays and need to be capitalized?” (Christmas, Archimedes, Anchorage, Zachary) “Which words are related to the human body?” (stomach, ache, bronchitis, bronchial)
Ask, “Which words have c-h at the beginning (Christmas, chorus, chemical, choir, chrome, chronicle), in the middle (Anchorage, scheme, orchid, bronchial, archeology, Archimedes, bronchitis), at the end (stomach, monarch)?”
Play CD Track 5 again and ask the students to join in the singing. Allow some students to point to the Mini-Charts words as they are sung.
Arrange letter tiles or plastic letters to form the words on each Mini-Charts page. Scramble the letters and re-form the words. See if students can do this without looking at the Mini-Charts. Check results and make corrections, if needed.
Sing along with CD Track 5 again (There Is No K in Christmas) and allow students to point to the target sets of words on the Mini-Charts while singing.

Follow-up:
Practice singing There is No K in Christmas daily for a week. Then try singing the song without hearing the words, using the instrumental track (Track 6). Allow different students to point to the Mini-Charts words while singing.
Help students create other sets of rhyming words for the song. Make 6 copies of Mini-Chart template p.117 and allow students write in the new sets of words. Examples: Initial position—chaos, character, chlorine, chasm, Christy, cholesterol. Medial position—architect, mechanic, mocha, schedule, scholar, Michael. Final position—Bach, bellyache, earache, headache, heartache, Heimlich. Place these pages back-to-back in page protectors in a 3-ring binder. Then sing the song with the instrumental version (Track 6).

Extensions:
Place Concentration with words from the song. Print Mini-Chart words on one set of index cards and their definitions on another set of cards. Make at least 6 sets of word/definition cards. Mix up the cards and lay them face down. Players turn sets of cards face up, reading the contents aloud. If a word/definition match is made, the player keeps the cards and takes another turn. If a match is not found, the cards are replaced face down and the next player takes a turn. At the end of the game, the player with the most cards wins.
Search dictionary appendixes, books of baby names, and/or telephone books for first or last names in which the letters c-h sound like the letter k. Print results on a word wall.
Hang circle cut-outs on a miniature Christmas tree. On each cut-out, print a word in which the letters c-h sound like the letter k.


Evaluation:
Students read all the words on Mini-Charts pp.26-33 without assistance, or
Students pass a spelling test on selected words from Mini-Charts pp.26-33

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Contractions Lesson Plan

Contraction Action
Objectives:
Students will learn to read and spell common contractions formed from a verb paired with the word not.
(Ex. do + not = don’t)
Students will learn to read and spell common contractions formed from a pronoun paired with a verb.
(Ex. I + am = I’m)
About the Concept:
Contractions are formed by combining two words and replacing one or more of the medial letters with an apostrophe. Once students have mastered the basic words in the song, they can think of other examples of diphthong words and practice them with the instrumental version of the song. Many contractions are formed when the word not follows a verb of being like is, are, was, or were. The basic song provides practice in forming these types of contractions by combining the two words and replacing the letter o with an apostrophe. Using instrumental version of the song with Mini-Chart templates of self-made flashcards, students can practice forming other types of contractions such as she’ll, we’d, or I’m. Step 7 of the lesson plan Follow-Up below provides alternate words for use with these other types of contractions.

Materials:
Sing Your Way Through Phonics Volume 2 CD, Tracks 17 and 18 (Listen to Real Audio or MP3 sample)
Sing Your Way Through Phonics Volume 2 Mini-Charts (pp. 73-84)
Index cards with the following words: did, do, is, are, could, would, will, not (10 copies), wo (word fragment), can
Optional:
Index cards he, she, we, they, you, I, have
Create apostrophe sticky notes in varying widths sufficient to cover 1, 2, 3, and 4 letters.
With black marker, draw an apostrophe in the center of each sticky note.
Make 10 copies of each size.
Note: If you do not have the CD or Mini-Charts, you can still teach this singular and plural possessive lesson plan using the folk tune listed on the Contraction Action song lyrics page. You can create your own mini-charts using the words in bold print letters in each verse of the Song Lyrics.

Find out more about Sing Your Way Through Phonics products.

Procedure: Say, “Does anyone know what the word contract means?” (to shorten or make smaller) Today, we will be looking at what happens when we combine two words and contract them into one smaller word. We call these shortened words contractions because the one combined word uses fewer letters than the two separate words.”
Point to the Mini-Charts on pages 74-75. As a group, read the two separate words at the top of the page and then read the contraction at the bottom of the page. Ask, “What did we leave out when the two words were pushed together?” (the letter o) Ask, “And what did we add in place of the letter o?” (an apostrophe)
Place the cards with the words did and not on the chalk ledge. Place the narrowest apostrophe sticky note on the chalkboard nearby.
Ask, “Who can combine these two words into the word didn’t?” (A student pushes the two words together and covers the letter o with the apostrophe sticky note.)
Repeat Steps 3 and 4 with the words do and not, forming the contraction don’t.
http://www.actionfactor.com/pages/lesson-plans/lesson-plans.html

Listen to Contraction Action on CD Track 17, pointing to the target words on Mini-Charts pp. 74-84. Ask the students to join in on the part of the song that repeats the contraction spelling rules. (“Just put ’em together and leave out the o. That is where the apostrophe goes, and contraction action ever goes marching on.”)
Ask, “What two words did not follow the contraction rule?” (will and not) Say, “Before we can put these two words together, what did we have to change?” (will to wo)
Place the cards with will and not on the chalk ledge. A small distance away, place the fragment wo on the chalk ledge. Place all four sizes of sticky notes on the chalkboard.
Ask, “Who can show the way the song tells us to form the word won’t?” (Push cards with will and not together, replace will with wo, and place the apostrophe sticky note over the o.)
Go over the words to the exception in the song. (The one exception to this rule is won’t. Unlike the others, change will to wo. It rhymes with don’t.)
Sing the song with CD Track 17 again and allow students to point to the target words on the Mini-Charts. One student can stand to the left of the charts and another can stand on the right. The person on the right also turns the pages when needed.
Repeat Steps 3 and 4 with the words is + not, are + not, could + not, would + not, does + not, was + not, have + not, and had + not.


Explain that there is another common contraction that we can from from the words can and not. Say, “What is the single word for can and not? Instead of saying I can not go, we can say I _____ go.” (can’t)
Say, “Who can form the contraction from these two words?” (Push can and not together. Replace the letters n and o with apostrophe. Use the 2-letter wide sticky note.)
Say, “What was different this time?” (We left out the letter n as well as the letter o and replaced them both with an apostrophe.)

Follow-up:

Practice singing Contraction Action daily for a few days. Allow some of the students to be the leaders, pointing to the Mini-Chart words.
Introduce other contraction words. (See Optional Materials above.) Using the word cards and apostrophe sticky notes, form the contractions he’s (he + is) and she’s (she + is). Discuss the fact that this time, the letter i is left out and replaced with an apostrophe.
Now form the words we’re (we + are), you’re (you + are), and they’re (they + are). Discuss the fact that this time, the letter a is left out and replaced with an apostrophe).
Using the word cards, form the words I’d (I + would), we’d (we + would), you’d (you + would), and they’d (they + would). Discuss the fact that this time, four letters are replaced with an apostrophe. Use the widest apostrophe sticky notes. Repeat with the words she’d and he’d.
Using the word cards, form the words I’ve (I + have), we’ve (we + have), you’ve (you + have), and they’ve (they + have). Discuss the fact that this time, two letters are replaced with an apostrophe. Use the second widest apostrophe sticky note.
Using the word cards, form the words I’ll (I + will), you’ll (you + will), we’ll (we + will), he’ll (he + will), she’ll (she + will), they’ll (they + will). Discuss the fact that this time, the letters w and i are replaced with an apostrophe.

Extensions:
Play a Bingo spelling game in which the caller states two words and the players remove the squares with the corresponding contraction. Print contractions on a 6 x 6 grid. Students cut apart the grid and place selected squares on a 5 x 5 grid. The first player with 5 empty squares in a row wins.
Read books with contractions: Polly Cameron’s I Can’t Said the Ant and Jack Prelutsky’s I’d Never Dine on Dinosaurs, I’m a Basic Boneless Chicken, I’d Never Eat a Beet, Ma, Don’t Throw That Shirt Out! and My Mother Says I’m Sickening (from The New Kid on the Block).
Duplicate the Mini-Chart templates on page 102 and write some of these other contraction examples. Using the instrumental version on CD Track 18, sing the song with the following words:
When ____ ____ becomes a single word, it’s ___, it’s ___.
When ____ ____ becomes a single word, it’s ___, it’s ___.
Save only the final letters, you see.
Replace the rest with apostrophe
And contraction action ever goes marching on

Evaluation:
Students read all the words on Mini-Charts pp. 74-84.
Students pass a spelling test on all Mini-Chart words and class-generated examples.
Students spell contraction words correctly in their journals and other writing assignments.

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