Saturday, September 26, 2009

Literacy Cooper and Kiger Chapter 2 Key Words - Read Aloud / Teacher Role

Great Sites http://www.reading.org/downloads/publications/videos/video_9183.mov http://www.reading.org/General/Publications/Videos/V9187.aspx Small Group Differentiated Lessons for Reading


Chapter 2 Flashcards http://college.cengage.com/education/cooper/literacy/6e/students/flashcards/ch2.html

CEngage Learning: http://cengage.com/cengage/discipline.do?disciplinenumber=3

The expected amount of growth a student should make in one year. - AYP –

Narrative and expository test in its original form ( trade book literature) – Authentic Literature

Fluent processing with little effort- Automaticity

A set of texts produced by a given publisher for teaching literacy- Basal reader

A combination of teacher-directed and student-centered activities. – Comprehensive Literacy Instruction

The part of the comprehensive lit instr. That all students need. – Core

The process of helping a student overcome an error by asking asking leading questions or guiing to a correct response – Corrective Feeback

Any text especially written to be decodable or to control high-frequency words, and overall difficulties- Created Text


A published or created text that is suitable for the application of previously taught phonics skills- decodable text

A structure for planning a listening lesson around a text that has been read aloud to teach a particular strategy or skill. A guided listening lesson has 3 parts: Introduction of the text, Listen and Respond, and Extend the text- Guided Listening Lesson

The most commonly occurring words in the English Language – High- Frequency Words

Knowledge and control of one’s own thinking and learning. In reading, - metacogniition

A concise teacher-directed lesson that is designed to teach a specific strategy, skill, concept , or process- Minilesson or Focus Lesson

Different ways in which a text can be read, moving from teacher-directed to student independent reading. Usually there are five modes of reading: Independent Reading, Cooperative Reading, Guided Reading, Shared Reading, and Read Aloud. – Modes of Reading

Different ways that writing can take place moving from teacher-directed to student independence. Usually there are five modes of writing: Independent Writing, Collaborative/Cooperative, Guided, Shared, and Write Aloud. – Modes of Writing

A text with some type of repeated pattern that allows students to anticipate what is likely to come on subsequent pages.- Predictable Text

The process of providing strong teacher support at the beginning and gradually taking it away as the student achieves independence- Scaffolding

Reflection Questions:




1. What is the role of the teacher in the classroom?

The Role of the Teacher is to be, as I had created a term in a previous class, A “ FACILI EDU CATOR” or :”FACILI CATOR” , the teacher is there to guide a lesson, to shy away from the traditional “ front of the class” teacher role, to more of a facilitator of guided learning ,assisting his or her students by modeling behaviors and providing edffective

focus lessons and reinforcing what was learned through repetition and summarizing. The “facilieducator” is there to guide discussions, as well as to provide and monitor brainstorming sessions. These are strategies for a successful and effective “facilieducator” to provide the best combination of “differentiated instruction” to a student population that will become more independent and successful.

Teacher as Lesson Planner: The Cooper & Kiger (1997) text goes on to explain that the role of the teacher is to “create circumstances and conditions within the classroom to support learning. Focus lessons or mini lessons are concise lessons that teach a specific skill, strategy, or process.” These lessons may use modeling to help demonstrate how to use the processes of reading and writing.

Teacher as Coach: A teacher can wear many hats and also act as a partner on a task with the student. As a cooperative learning teacher, the facilitator observes the activity while the students are involved in the project, and provides directive support or coaching through questions and suggestions.

Teacher as Supporter and Guide to Responses: Cooper and Kiger (1997) also explain that the teacher supports and preplans the processes that encourage responding. The facilieducator will plan the strategies to use to stimulate thought processes, before, during, and after reading and writing. The teacher becomes the scaffold builder, providing the basic support at the beginning and gradually taking it away as the student achieves independence.





2. What are the benefits and value of a 'Read-Aloud?'

The characteristics that come to mind are THE FOLLOWING: Read Aloud “helps students activate knowledge that has already been acquired” and helps students “develop background vocabulary and concepts.” In addition, it is a way to “model” the process of real reading, and acts as a comfortable support for a strong teacher, to provide an interactive learning experience with skills that may be a bit difficult.

The text explains the use of Reading Aloud in a Comprehensive Literacy Program can be used to “convey their love and excitement for both reading and learning”. Most consider such reading to be “ the single most important activity for eventual success in reading”(Anderson et al 1985, p.23) Studies show the importance of Reading Aloud by their parents at home, as well as the importance of this activity in the interactive classroom. It goes on further to explain 3 purposes for reading aloud in the CLP program: 1) TO PROVIDE ENJOYMENT AND MOTIVATION, 2) BUILD/DEVELOP VOCABULARY, and 3) TO TEACH SPECIFIC STRATEGIES FOR COMPREHENSION. Read Alouds also come in 2 different categories: General and Instructional.

What I found most helpful was a summary list of Read Aloud strategies listed below: 1) READ ALOUD EVERYDAY, 2) HAVE A COMFORTABLE PLACE FOR READING ALOUD, 3) SELECT BOOKS THAT BOTH YOU AND YOUR CHILDREN WILL ENJOY, 4) READ WITH FEELING, 5) ALLOW TIME FOR DISCUSSION, 5) DON’T ALLOW THIS TIME TO BE A TIME TO TEST, 6) ALLOW STUDENTS TO WRITE OR DRAW AS THEY LISTEN.

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