Sunday, September 27, 2009

NY1 Covers “There Is No Excuse” Meeting on Staten Island

http://www.edwize.org/ny1-covers-there-is-no-excuse-meeting-on-staten-island
May. 15, 2009

4:30 pm

by W.J. Levay



Filed under: UFT News







Carmen Alvarez, UFT vice president for special education, displays a campaign poster.

The UFT’s five-borough “There is No Excuse” special-education campaign was in the Willowbrook section of Staten Island on May 12 to meet parents dissatisfied with how the IEPs of their special-needs children are being met by the DOE, and to offer some common solutions. NY1 News covered the event.



Click here or on the image above to watch the video.



Tagged: NY1, special education, Staten Island, video



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Love Song - Punk Goes Pop with lyrics

Saturday, September 26, 2009

The Cab - Disturbia (PUNK GOES POP 2)

Literacy Cooper and Kiger Chapter 2 Key Words - Read Aloud / Teacher Role

Great Sites http://www.reading.org/downloads/publications/videos/video_9183.mov http://www.reading.org/General/Publications/Videos/V9187.aspx Small Group Differentiated Lessons for Reading


Chapter 2 Flashcards http://college.cengage.com/education/cooper/literacy/6e/students/flashcards/ch2.html

CEngage Learning: http://cengage.com/cengage/discipline.do?disciplinenumber=3

The expected amount of growth a student should make in one year. - AYP –

Narrative and expository test in its original form ( trade book literature) – Authentic Literature

Fluent processing with little effort- Automaticity

A set of texts produced by a given publisher for teaching literacy- Basal reader

A combination of teacher-directed and student-centered activities. – Comprehensive Literacy Instruction

The part of the comprehensive lit instr. That all students need. – Core

The process of helping a student overcome an error by asking asking leading questions or guiing to a correct response – Corrective Feeback

Any text especially written to be decodable or to control high-frequency words, and overall difficulties- Created Text


A published or created text that is suitable for the application of previously taught phonics skills- decodable text

A structure for planning a listening lesson around a text that has been read aloud to teach a particular strategy or skill. A guided listening lesson has 3 parts: Introduction of the text, Listen and Respond, and Extend the text- Guided Listening Lesson

The most commonly occurring words in the English Language – High- Frequency Words

Knowledge and control of one’s own thinking and learning. In reading, - metacogniition

A concise teacher-directed lesson that is designed to teach a specific strategy, skill, concept , or process- Minilesson or Focus Lesson

Different ways in which a text can be read, moving from teacher-directed to student independent reading. Usually there are five modes of reading: Independent Reading, Cooperative Reading, Guided Reading, Shared Reading, and Read Aloud. – Modes of Reading

Different ways that writing can take place moving from teacher-directed to student independence. Usually there are five modes of writing: Independent Writing, Collaborative/Cooperative, Guided, Shared, and Write Aloud. – Modes of Writing

A text with some type of repeated pattern that allows students to anticipate what is likely to come on subsequent pages.- Predictable Text

The process of providing strong teacher support at the beginning and gradually taking it away as the student achieves independence- Scaffolding

Reflection Questions:




1. What is the role of the teacher in the classroom?

The Role of the Teacher is to be, as I had created a term in a previous class, A “ FACILI EDU CATOR” or :”FACILI CATOR” , the teacher is there to guide a lesson, to shy away from the traditional “ front of the class” teacher role, to more of a facilitator of guided learning ,assisting his or her students by modeling behaviors and providing edffective

focus lessons and reinforcing what was learned through repetition and summarizing. The “facilieducator” is there to guide discussions, as well as to provide and monitor brainstorming sessions. These are strategies for a successful and effective “facilieducator” to provide the best combination of “differentiated instruction” to a student population that will become more independent and successful.

Teacher as Lesson Planner: The Cooper & Kiger (1997) text goes on to explain that the role of the teacher is to “create circumstances and conditions within the classroom to support learning. Focus lessons or mini lessons are concise lessons that teach a specific skill, strategy, or process.” These lessons may use modeling to help demonstrate how to use the processes of reading and writing.

Teacher as Coach: A teacher can wear many hats and also act as a partner on a task with the student. As a cooperative learning teacher, the facilitator observes the activity while the students are involved in the project, and provides directive support or coaching through questions and suggestions.

Teacher as Supporter and Guide to Responses: Cooper and Kiger (1997) also explain that the teacher supports and preplans the processes that encourage responding. The facilieducator will plan the strategies to use to stimulate thought processes, before, during, and after reading and writing. The teacher becomes the scaffold builder, providing the basic support at the beginning and gradually taking it away as the student achieves independence.





2. What are the benefits and value of a 'Read-Aloud?'

The characteristics that come to mind are THE FOLLOWING: Read Aloud “helps students activate knowledge that has already been acquired” and helps students “develop background vocabulary and concepts.” In addition, it is a way to “model” the process of real reading, and acts as a comfortable support for a strong teacher, to provide an interactive learning experience with skills that may be a bit difficult.

The text explains the use of Reading Aloud in a Comprehensive Literacy Program can be used to “convey their love and excitement for both reading and learning”. Most consider such reading to be “ the single most important activity for eventual success in reading”(Anderson et al 1985, p.23) Studies show the importance of Reading Aloud by their parents at home, as well as the importance of this activity in the interactive classroom. It goes on further to explain 3 purposes for reading aloud in the CLP program: 1) TO PROVIDE ENJOYMENT AND MOTIVATION, 2) BUILD/DEVELOP VOCABULARY, and 3) TO TEACH SPECIFIC STRATEGIES FOR COMPREHENSION. Read Alouds also come in 2 different categories: General and Instructional.

What I found most helpful was a summary list of Read Aloud strategies listed below: 1) READ ALOUD EVERYDAY, 2) HAVE A COMFORTABLE PLACE FOR READING ALOUD, 3) SELECT BOOKS THAT BOTH YOU AND YOUR CHILDREN WILL ENJOY, 4) READ WITH FEELING, 5) ALLOW TIME FOR DISCUSSION, 5) DON’T ALLOW THIS TIME TO BE A TIME TO TEST, 6) ALLOW STUDENTS TO WRITE OR DRAW AS THEY LISTEN.

Wednesday, September 23, 2009

http://sites.google.com/site/mrscoopers4thgradeliteracy/

http://openlibrary.org/beta

http://openlibrary.org/beta

Cooper

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rlz=1T4GPEA_enUS318&q=cooper+literacy&aq=0&oq=cooper+liter&aqi=g3g-m2

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rlz=1T4GPEA_enUS318&q=cooper+literacy&aq=0&oq=cooper+liter&aqi=g3g-m2

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rlz=1T4GPEA_enUS318&q=cooper+kiger&aq=f&oq=&aqi=

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&rlz=1T4GPEA_enUS318&q=cooper+kiger&aq=f&oq=&aqi=

Cooper and Kiger Literacy

http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4GPEA_enUS318&q=cooper+kiger+read+aloud+%22role+of+teacher%22
Emergent Literacy Emergent literacy is a "continuously emerging and evolving ability that results from ... engage in at home and at school during their early years (Reutzel & Cooter, 2004). ... Such repetition is a natural stage in literacy development, ...


wps.prenhall.com/chet_literacy.../0,8776,1164734-,00.html - Cached - Similar -

Teaching children with reading difficulties - Google Books Result by Deslea Konza - 2006 - Education - 188 pages

Emergent literacy stage (2-5 years) Many early experiences help young children prepare for reading. There is considerable evidence that, ...

books.google.com/books?isbn=0170128970... -

[RTF] Acknowledging, Fostering, Measuring and Monitoring Emergent ... File Format: Rich Text Format - View as HTML

Teachers' beliefs and understandings in the preschool: Preschool literacy project stage 1. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 2(2), 157-168. ...

www.dest.gov.au/sectors/.../literacy.../Sub_299_WEB_rtf.htm - Similar -

[PDF] Promoting Emergent Literacy through Developmentally-Appropriate ... File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat

This, in turn, promotes the children to explore literacy and move into the emergent literacy stage. In early childhood classrooms, the children‟s names are ...

students.uwsp.edu/jwarz647/soeportfolio/.../SpecialTopic.pdf - Similar -

Amazon.com: Emergent Literacy and Language Development: Promoting ... Emergent Literacy and Language Development: Promoting Learning in Early ... and emergent literacy skills, and how this sets the stage for later literacy ...

www.amazon.com/Emergent-Literacy.../dp/.../1606233009 - Cached - Similar -

Linking reading assessment to instruction: an application worktext ... - Google Books Result by Arleen Shearer Mariotti, Susan P. Homan - 2005 - Education - 280 pages

STRUCTURED OBSERVATION OF THE EMERGENT LITERACY STAGE During the past twenty years, ... about print are vital to his or her success in early reading. ...

books.google.com/books

What is Differentiated Instruction

http://www.ericdigests.org/2001-2/elementary.html

Differentiation of Instruction in the Elementary Grades. ERIC Digest.


by Tomlinson, Carol Ann



In most elementary classrooms, some students struggle with learning, others perform well beyond grade-level expectations, and the rest fit somewhere in between. Within each of these categories of students, individuals also learn in a variety of ways and have different interests. To meet the needs of a diverse student population, many teachers differentiate instruction. This Digest describes differentiated instruction, discusses the reasons for differentiating instruction, discusses what makes it successful, and suggests how teachers can start implementing it.



WHAT IS DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION?



At its most basic level, differentiation consists of the efforts of teachers to respond to variance among learners in the classroom. Whenever a teacher reaches out to an individual or small group to vary his or her teaching in order to create the best learning experience possible, that teacher is differentiating instruction.



Teachers can differentiate at least four classroom elements based on student readiness, interest, or learning profile: (1) content--what the student needs to learn or how the student will get access to the information; (2) process--activities in which the student engages in order to make sense of or master the content; (3) products--culminating projects that ask the student to rehearse, apply, and extend what he or she has learned in a unit; and (4) learning environment--the way the classroom works and feels.



Content. Examples of differentiating content at the elementary level include the following: (1) using reading materials at varying readability levels; (2) putting text materials on tape; (3) using spelling or vocabulary lists at readiness levels of students; (4) presenting ideas through both auditory and visual means; (5) using reading buddies; and (6) meeting with small groups to re-teach an idea or skill for struggling learners, or to extend the thinking or skills of advanced learners.



Process. Examples of differentiating process or activities at the elementary level include the following: (1) using tiered activities through which all learners work with the same important understandings and skills, but proceed with different levels of support, challenge, or complexity; (2) providing interest centers that encourage students to explore subsets of the class topic of particular interest to them; (3) developing personal agendas (task lists written by the teacher and containing both in-common work for the whole class and work that addresses individual needs of learners) to be completed either during specified agenda time or as students complete other work early; (4) offering manipulative's or other hands-on supports for students who need them; and (5) varying the length of time a student may take to complete a task in order to provide additional support for a struggling learner or to encourage an advanced learner to pursue a topic in greater depth.



Products. Examples of differentiating products at the elementary level include the following: (1) giving students options of how to express required learning (e.g., create a puppet show, write a letter, or develop a mural with labels); (2) using rubrics that match and extend students' varied skills levels; (3) allowing students to work alone or in small groups on their products; and (4) encouraging students to create their own product assignments as long as the assignments contain required elements.



Learning Environment. Examples of differentiating learning environment at the elementary level include: (1) making sure there are places in the room to work quietly and without distraction, as well as places that invite student collaboration; (2) providing materials that reflect a variety of cultures and home settings; (3) setting out clear guidelines for independent work that matches individual needs; (4) developing routines that allow students to get help when teachers are busy with other students and cannot help them immediately; and (5) helping students understand that some learners need to move around to learn, while others do better sitting quietly (Tomlinson, 1995, 1999; Winebrenner, 1992, 1996).



WHY DIFFERENTIATE INSTRUCTION IN THE ELEMENTARY GRADES?



A simple answer is that students in the elementary grades vary greatly, and if teachers want to maximize their students' individual potential, they will have to attend to the differences.



There is ample evidence that students are more successful in school and find it more satisfying if they are taught in ways that are responsive to their readiness levels (e.g., Vygotsky, 1986), interests (e.g., Csikszentmihalyi, 1997) and learning profiles (e.g., Sternberg, Torff, & Grigorenko, 1998). Another reason for differentiating instruction relates to teacher professionalism. Expert teachers are attentive to students' varied learning needs (Danielson, 1996); to differentiate instruction, then, is to become a more competent, creative, and professional educator.



WHAT MAKES DIFFERENTIATION SUCCESSFUL?



The most important factor in differentiation that helps students achieve more and feel more engaged in school is being sure that what teachers differentiate is high-quality curriculum and instruction. For example, teachers can make sure that: (1) curriculum is clearly focused on the information and understandings that are most valued by an expert in a particular discipline; (2) lessons, activities, and products are designed to ensure that students grapple with, use, and come to understand those essentials; (3) materials and tasks are interesting to students and seem relevant to them; (4) learning is active; and (5) there is joy and satisfaction in learning for each student.



One challenge for teachers leading a differentiated classroom is the need to reflect constantly on the quality of what is being differentiated. Developing three avenues to an ill-defined outcome is of little use. Offering four ways to express trivia is a waste of planning time and is unlikely to produce impressive results for learners.



There is no recipe for differentiation. Rather, it is a way of thinking about teaching and learning that values the individual and can be translated into classroom practice in many ways. Still, the following broad principles and characteristics are useful in establishing a defensible differentiated classroom:



* ASSESSMENT IS ONGOING AND TIGHTLY LINKED TO INSTRUCTION. Teachers are hunters and gatherers of information about their students and how those students are learning at a given point. Whatever the teachers can glean about student readiness, interest, and learning helps the teachers plan next steps in instruction.



* TEACHERS WORK HARD TO ENSURE "RESPECTFUL ACTIVITIES" FOR ALL STUDENTS. Each student's work should be equally interesting, equally appealing, and equally focused on essential understandings and skills. There should not be a group of students that frequently does "dull drill" and another that generally does "fluff." Rather, everyone is continually working with tasks that students and teachers perceive to be worthwhile and valuable.



* FLEXIBLE GROUPING IS A HALLMARK OF THE CLASS. Teachers plan extended periods of instruction so that all students work with a variety of peers over a period of days. Sometimes students work with like-readiness peers, sometimes with mixed-readiness groups, sometimes with students who have similar interests, sometimes with students who have different interests, sometimes with peers who learn as they do, sometimes randomly, and often with the class as a whole. In addition, teachers can assign students to work groups, and sometimes students will select their own work groups. Flexible grouping allows students to see themselves in a variety of contexts and aids the teacher in "auditioning" students in different settings and with different kinds of work (Tomlinson, 1995, 1999).



WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO BEGIN DIFFERENTIATION?



Teachers are as different as their learners. Some teachers naturally and robustly differentiated instruction early in their careers. For other teachers, establishing a truly flexible and responsive classroom seems daunting. It is helpful for a teacher who wants to become more effective at differentiation to remember to balance his or her own needs with those of the students. Once again, there are no recipes. Nonetheless, the following guidelines are helpful to many teachers as they begin to differentiate, begin to differentiate more proactively, or seek to refine a classroom that can already be called "differentiated":



* Frequently reflect on the match between your classroom and the philosophy of teaching and learning you want to practice. Look for matches and mismatches, and use both to guide you.



* Create a mental image of what you want your classroom to look like, and use it to help plan and assess changes.



* Prepare students and parents for a differentiated classroom so that they are your partners in making it a good fit for everyone. Be sure to talk often with students about the classroom--why it is the way it is, how it is working, and what everyone can do to help.



* Begin to change at a pace that pushes you a little bit beyond your comfort zone--neither totally duplicating past practice nor trying to change everything overnight. You might begin with just one subject, just one time of the day, or just one curricular element (content, process, product, or learning environment).



* Think carefully about management routines--for example, giving directions, making sure students know how to move about the room, and making sure students know where to put work when they finish it.



* Teach the routines to students carefully, monitor the effectiveness of the routines, discuss results with students, and fine tune together.



* Take time off from change to regain your energy and to assess how things are going.



* Build a support system of other educators. Let administrators know how they can support you. Ask specialists (e.g., in gifted education, special education, second language instruction) to co-teach with you from time to time so you have a second pair of hands and eyes. Form study groups on differentiation with like-minded peers. Plan and share differentiated materials with colleagues.



* Enjoy your own growth. One of the great joys of teaching is recognizing that the teacher always has more to learn than the students and that learning is no less empowering for adults than for students.



FOR MORE INFORMATION



Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1997). FINDING FLOW: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF ENGAGEMENT WITH EVERYDAY LIFE. New York: Basic Books.



Danielson, C. (1996). ENHANCING PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: A FRAMEWORK FOR TEACHING. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. ED 403 245.



Sternberg, R. J., Torff, B., & Grigorenko, E. L. (1998). Teaching triarchically improves student achievement. JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, 90(3), 374-384. EJ 576 492.



Tomlinson, C. (1995). HOW TO DIFFERENTIATE INSTRUCTION IN MIXED-ABILITY CLASSROOMS. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. ED 386 301.



Tomlinson, C. (1999). THE DIFFERENTIATED CLASSROOM: RESPONDING TO THE NEEDS OF ALL LEARNERS. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. ED 429 944.



Vygotsky, L. (1986). THOUGHT AND LANGUAGE. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.



Winebrenner, S. (1992). TEACHING GIFTED KIDS IN THE REGULAR CLASSROOM. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit. Winebrenner, S. (1996). TEACHING KIDS WITH LEARNING DIFFICULTIES IN THE REGULAR CLASSROOM. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit. ED 396 502.

































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EDSE 665 Questions Role of Teacher and Read Aloud

Week 2 - Assignment (10/04/2009)


Read Textbook Chapters 2. Weekly Papers - 2 Questions

Reflection Questions:

1. What is the role of the teacher in the classroom ?



2. What are the benefits and value of a 'Read-Aloud' ?

This dissertation entitled

THE IMPACT OF ONE-ON-ONE TUTORING

ON FIRST-FOURTH GRADE STUDENTS’ WORD WRITING ABILITIES

FOR COMPLEXITY, ACCURACY, AND FLUENCY

A dissertation presented to the faculty of

the College of Education of Ohio University

Julie Barnhart Francis

November 2006

READ ALOUD

http://etd.ohiolink.edu/send-pdf.cgi/Barnhart%20Francis%20Julie%20L.pdf?ohiou1164127774

While researchers tend to agree that children learn despite the choice of instructional approach based on differing theories of reading, that children move fluidly through stages of literacy development, and that the role of teacher is critical to the children’s literacy development, there continues to be a gap in the literature regarding the teaching of writing in the literacy development of children.

Literacy Interventions and Tutoring

A review of effective literacy interventions and tutoring programs reveals several common principles. These principles include:

1) emphasis on more intensive interventions such as one-on-one tutorial models (D'Agostino & Murphy, 2004; Duffy-Hester, 1999; Elbaum, Vaughn, Hughes, & Moody, 2000),

2) explicit instruction in the context of authentic reading and writing activities (Pressley, 2006),

3) appropriateness of individualized instruction informed by assessment (Johnston, 2003; Serafini, 2001; Valencia & Buly, 2004),

4) professional development for teachers and tutors (Allington & Cunningham, 2001; Pinnell, Lyons, Deford, Bryk, & Seltzer, 1994),

5) shared responsibility for all students by all school personnel (Taylor, Pearson, Peterson, & Rodriguez, 2005), and

6) increased parental involvement (Englund, Luckner, Whaley, & Egeland, 2004; Tracey, 2000).

17

Two types of literacy interventions and tutoring programs, preventive interventions and interventions for acceleration, are identified in the literature (Allington, 2005). Preventive interventions, which include early intervention programs, focus on reducing the incidence of reading difficulties (Strickland, 2002). Interventions for acceleration focus on speeding up literacy development by adding instructional support for under-achieving students (Shanker & Ekwall, 2002). A third, new type of intervention called Response to Intervention provides a three-tiered model with increasing levels of intervention for all areas of academics, including literacy, at each tier (Boswell, 2005; National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities, 2005).

Two factors greatly influence the effectiveness of literacy interventions: levels of expertise and levels of intensity (Allington, 2005; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 2000). Levels of expertise refer to the training and professional development of the teachers and tutors delivering the interventions (Elbaum et al., 2000; Pinnell et al., 1994; Wasik & Slavin, 1993). Levels of intensity refer the students’ engagement in the learning (Ramey & Ramey, 1998) and the ratio of teachers to students in the intervention (Mathes et al., 2005; O'Connor, 2000; Simmons, Kame'Enui, Stoolmiller, Coyne, & Harn, 2003; Torgesen, Rashotte, Alexander, Alexander, & Macphee, 2003).



ROLE OF TEACHER

Implications of the Study

There are several implications that can be drawn from the findings of this study. This section will discuss implications for teachers and for research in regards to word writing fluency, accuracy, and complexity.

Word Writing Fluency

Although the quantitative results did not show statistically significant results for one-on-one tutoring on the word writing abilities of fluency, findings do indicate that children in primary grades, especially grades one and two, made gains in word writing fluency despite the tutor group.

Implications for teachers. Word recognition is critical to reading and writing with fluency (Fountas & Pinnell, 1996). Classroom instruction should incorporate word study

123

in various ways. Explicit instruction in word work or demonstration of the generative nature of words (how to get to new words using what children know about words and word parts) and the reciprocity of reading and writing are essential (Bear et al., 2003, Taberski, 2000).

Teachers should incorporate massive amounts of text read by students at their appropriate independent and instructional levels to reinforce automatic word recognition and develop strategies for noticing and learning new words. In addition, books read aloud to students would expose them to new words and different ways to use words.

Teachers should plan daily, authentic writing activities. Writing activities encourage children to notice finer details of print and develop phonemic awareness and sequential organizations of text (Schmitt et al., 2005).

Teachers should administer word writing assessments, such as Leal’s (2005/2006) CAFÉ, frequently and ongoing as a check on each student’s progress in writing more words. Teachers can analyze the results to inform their instruction in word study, demonstration, writing conferences, and book choice for students, as well as track the progress of the student’s writing.

Implications for research. Findings from this study regarding the impact of one-on-one tutoring show that students identified as the lowest-performing can make gains in word writing fluency commensurate with their average-performing peers. This may help to justify the importance of literacy intervention as a preventive measure for children that are at-risk for reading and writing failure. Individualized instruction that identifies the strengths and needs of struggling students and provides high levels of expertise and intensity to unravel confusions in literacy learning and build an effective processing

124

system that problem solves and grows should be further researched. Studies on the effectiveness of one-on-one tutoring should incorporate random assignment of students to treatment and control groups. Additionally, studies on the effectiveness of one-on-one tutoring should involve larger numbers of student participants.

Word Writing Accuracy

Although the quantitative results did not show statistically significant results for one-on-one tutoring on the word writing abilities of accuracy, findings do indicate that children in primary grades, especially grades one and two, made gains in word writing accuracy despite the tutor group.

Implications for teachers. Gains in word writing accuracy are highly correlated to gains in word writing fluency. Thus, implications for teachers regarding word writing accuracy are very similar to implications for teachers regarding word writing fluency. Quality classroom instruction that emphasizes speaking, reading, and writing is vital to developing word knowledge and usage (Clay, 2004).

Teachers should incorporate instructional approaches related to building fluency with words and known word parts. Words that students know how to spell correctly make up their personal writing vocabularies (Clay, 2001). These vocabularies of known words should be used to teach new words for both reading and writing purposes.

Implications for research. Analyses of existing studies on the Word Writing CAFÉ (Leal, 2005/2006) reveal commonly-written words. These words can be used for instructional purposes to build word stores or as a meter of teacher’s instruction. Additional research on high-frequency word development and sight word development in early grades should continue and inform classroom instruction.

125

Further research, particularly with older students, on the development of accuracy in spelling of longer words in isolation and within the context of authentic writing, should be explored and studied. More information is needed in regards to making gains in word writing fluency and accuracy as compared to making gains in word writing complexity.





Please click on the link below to submit your assignment.

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 2 - Assignment (10/04/2009)



Week 3 - Assignment (10/11/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 3



Weekly Papers - 1 Question



Reflection Question:



1. Choose two non-fiction books for children and identify the expository structures of each. Then decide on the best strategy for activating prior knowledge for each and give your rationale.



Please click on the link below to submit your assignment.

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 3 - Assignment (10/11/2009)



Week 4 - Assignment (10/18/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 4.



Weekly Papers - 2 Questions



Reflection Questions:



1. What is 'reciprocal' teaching? (Focus on procedures & possible uses).



2. List the seven strategies that help to construct meaning. Give an example of each strategy.





Please click on the link below to submit your assignment.

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 4 - Assignment (10/18/2009)



Week 5 - Assignment (10/25/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 5.



Weekly Papers - 2 Questions



Reflection Questions:



1. What are the elements that lead to successful independent reading?



2. What are the components of a balanced literacy program? Briefly explain each component.





Please click on the link below to submit your assignment.

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 5 - Assignment (10/25/2009)



Week 5 - Reaction Paper 10/25/2009)

Please read the article on the following website and write a reaction paper no longer than 2 pages (double spaced).



Website :http://edwize.org/decoding-grammar

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 5 - Reaction Paper 10/25/2009)



Week 6 - Assignment (11/01/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 6 & 7 .



Weekly Papers - 4 Questions



Reflection Questions:



1 How do students acquire vocabulary?



2. What are the elements of effective vocabulary development? .



3. How would students respond to literature? Describe the categories.



4. Describe the procedures that promote responding to literature.



Please click on the link below to submit your assignment.

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 6 - Assignment (11/01/2009)



Week 7: Assignment (11/08/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 8 & 9.



Weekly Papers - 4 Questions



Reflection Questions:



1 Explain, giving at least 5 reasons, why reading and writing have to be taught together ?



2. What is the difference between remediation and intervention? How does this difference change the way instruction is planned and carried out?



3. Distinguish between the strategies and skills the classroom teacher needs to teach to struggling readers and those required to be taught to all students, including struggling readers. How would one change the way a required skill or strategy is taught to a group of struggling readers?



4. Review the 2 levels of text needed for struggling readers; grade level and developmentally appropriate. How can a classroom teacher provide instruction for struggling readers in each of these types of text?





Please click on the link below to submit your assignment

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 7: Assignment (11/08/2009)



Week 8: Assignment (11/15/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 10.



Weekly Papers - 3 Questions



Reflection Questions:



1 What are the guidelines for organizing and managing a balanced literacy classroom?



2. Why do teachers need to use leveled/developmentally appropriate books for the students in their class?



3. Why is it important for teachers to keep records of every student in the class?









Please click on the link below to submit your assignment

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 8: Assignment (11/15/2009)



Week 9: Assignment (11/29/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 11.



Weekly Papers - 2 Questions



Reflection Questions:



1 What is assessment? How does it relate to evaluation? Describe.



2. Describe a formal and informal assessment.

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 9: Assignment (11/29/2009)



Final Paper - Literacy Lesson (12/06/2009)

Prepare a literacy lesson, complete with mini lessons as per text book. You should report the development, application, and analysis of one or several lessons/activities to teach a literacy lesson. Describe why those activities/lessons can help students to develop literacy skills and construct meaning. To support your rationale, use references from what you have learned in the course and from other sources in the APA format. Discuss each activity, if you have more than one, in detail.



Your lesson must include the description of:



a. The target population the characteristics of the learners for whom the activity is planned.



b. The prerequisites (if necessary), the specific objective(s) of the activity, and the content and language standards to which they relate. If you are not a classroom teacher, specify the output expected from this activity.



c. The role of the teacher and the students.



d. The resources, materials, and other elements that will be used to create a learning environment that addresses the needs of the population.



e. List the principles of learning or the standards and all the references used to develop the lesson.

>> View/Complete Assignment: Final Paper - Literacy Lesson (12/06/2009)

Staten Island People

List of people from Staten Island
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Actors/Actresses

Eric Close - Actor who plays "Martin Fitzgerald" on the CBS drama Without a Trace
John Dehner - Television and movie actor born on Staten Island. A notable and one of Hollywoods best character actors, Dehner played Doris Day's boss Sy Bennett on The Doris Day Show. He appeared in three classic Twilight Zone episodes and other movies and television shows. Western fans came to know Dehner as "Paladin" on radio's "Have Gun, Will Travel" in his radio days.
David Dukes - Actor, lived in Brighton Heights briefly.
Jennifer Esposito - Actress Spin City, Summer of Sam attended Moore Catholic High School
Carmine Giovinazzo - Actor who plays Detective Danny Messer on the CBS drama CSI: NY. He is a cousin of director Buddy Giovinazzo.
Dan Grimaldi - The Sopranos Patsy Parisi, former resident
Larry Harmon- Bozo the Clown lived on Staten Island
Allen Jenkins - Hollywood character actor, voice of cartoon Top Cat's Officer Dibble was born on Staten Island
Hassan Johnson - Actor, featured in The Wire, Belly, etc.
Yunjin Kim - Actress on Lost (TV series)
Paul Land- actor Spring Break, The Idolmaker
Bob Levy - comic, Rev.Bob Levy was raised on Great Kills
Robert Loggia - Actor (Scarface, The Sopranos, Big, etc.) New Dorp High School graduate
Alyssa Milano - Actress, she was raised on Staten Island.
Paul Newman - Actor, married to Joanne Woodward, lived in the Art Deco apartment building on the corner of Daniel low terrace and Fort Hill Circle in St. George, Staten Island[1]
Edward Platt - Actor who played the famous character "The Chief" on the 1960s TV show Get Smart, was born on Staten Island
Eddie Pepitone- Comic, won Last Comic Standing
Tristan Wilds - Actor, The Wire
Tony Reali - Stat Boy on Pardon the Interruption, Host of Around the Horn
Larry Romano - Actor The King of Queens, NYPD Blue
Theo Rossi - Actor Sons of Anarchy
Gianni Russo - Actor was raised on Staten Island. Gianni played Carlo Rizzi in The Godfather
Raymond Serra - Actor, was in Gotti and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Glenn Scarpelli - Child actor from One Day at a Time born and raised in Staten Island
Steven R. Schirripa - Bobby Bacala from The Sopranos
Rick Schroder - Actor who played "Ricky Stratton" on the 1980s NBC sitcom Silver Spoons and "Detective Danny Sorenson" on the ABC drama NYPD Blue, and has recently played "Mike Doyle" on "24". Currently appearing as "Dr. Dylan West" on the Lifetime drama Strong Medicine
Steven Seagal - Actor, lived on Staten Island.[1]
Martin Sheen - Actor, lived on Staten Island in St. George
Lenny Venito - Actor, Murmur from The Sopranos, Gigli, War of the Worlds
Joanne Woodward - Actress, married to Paul Newman, lived in the Art Deco apartment building on the corner of Daniel low terrace and Fort Hill Circle in St. George, Staten Island




Clear Comfort, The Alice Austen House MuseumArtists

Alice Austen - Photographer, lived all of her life on Staten Island.[2] The MV Alice Austen, one of the Staten Island Ferry boats, is named in her honor.
Edward Sargent - Architect, Artist-lived Tomkinsville -designed many SI schools,a NY Armory and 100s of homes on SI and in the NY area. His ornate victorian designs can still be seen in many SI homes and the St George historic area.
Alice Sargent Johnson - Illustrator -lifelong Staten Islander Born 1882. Attended Art Students League. Commercial artist, illustrated early 1900s magazines such as Harpers Bazaar and many books. Died in Clifton 1950.
Evan Campbell - Sculptor/Special effects artist - credits include The Last of the Mohicans, Pulp Fiction, From Dusk Till Dawn, The Faculty, Wes Craven's New Nightmare, Dogma and Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back lived in the Grymes Hill apartments.
Jasper Francis Cropsey - A landscape artist of the Hudson River School who was born on his family's farm in Rossville.[3]
Evan Dorkin - Cartoonist and creator of Milk & Cheese is a long time resident of Staten Island
Francesco Scavullo - Photographer. born on Staten Island.
Cynthia von Buhler - Artist and children's book author. Currently resides in Staten Island.
Inventors

Antonio Meucci - Disputed inventor of the telephone, immigrated to Staten Island, settling in the Clifton area in 1850, where he would live for the remainder of his life.
Charles Goodyear- inventor -lived on SI for several years. Experimented with rubber 1836-39 on SI . The SI business failed and he moved to Boston. In 1840s he patented the volcanization of rubbber.
Thomas Adams (1818-1905) - Founder of the chewing gum industry, later teamed up with William Wrigley Jr. Lived on SI in the 1860s-1870s. Invented chewing gum and produced on SI.
Tom O'Reilly - Web entrepreneur and Internet advertising guru.
Musicians

Christina Aguilera - Pop singer. Born on Staten Island.[1]
Steve Augeri - Former Lead Singer of the rock band Journey
Joan Baez - Folk singer, born on Staten Island
Vito Bratta - Guitarist for White Lion lives on Staten Island
Bobby Darin - Singer, his family had a summer home as a child in South Beach, Staten Island.
Roy Clark - Country singer, Hee Haw star, and guitarist, actually grew up in Great Kills, Staten Island.[citation needed]
Ron Dante - Lead singer for The Archies, big hit was the number 1 song "Sugar Sugar".
The Elegants- #1 hit record in 1959 "Little Star", song was actually recorded in a South Beach Staten Island studio.
Steven Duren - Better known as Blackie Lawless, lead singer of the 1980s heavy metal band W.A.S.P. Lawless, who is a friend of fellow Staten Islander David Johansen, replaced Johnny Thunders in the New York Dolls when he was 18.
Eamon Doyle - Rapper, born and raised on Staten Island
Force MD's - Was born and raised on Staten Island had a top ten song Tender Love in 1986, produced by longtime Janet Jackson producers Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis
Galt MacDermot - Music and Lyricist for musicals such as Hair and The Two Gentlemen of Verona currently lives on Silver Lake Road with his wife.
Ghostface Killah - Rapper/Wu-Tang Clan member born and raised on Staten Island.
George Harrison - Of the Beatles briefly lived in Staten Island near Staten Island University Hospital while being treated for cancer there.
David Johansen - (aka Buster Poindexter) of the New York Dolls
Lady GaGa- lived in Great Kills
Lil' Suzy - freestyle singer
Madonna - Lived in the Stapleton area briefly. Her video "Papa Don't Preach" was filmed there. Madonna chose the location herself. She said the neighborhood was perfect premise for the video story.
Method Man - Clifford Smith - Rapper/Wu-Tang Clan member moved to Staten Island as a child.
Ingrid Michaelson - Indie-pop singer/songwriter; a Staten Island Technical High School graduate.
A.J. Pero - Drummer for Twisted Sister
Keith Richards - Rolling Stones guitarist. For a time in the 1980's, he owned a home on the South Shore of Staten Island.
Vernon Reid - Guitar player for Living Colour
Gene Simmons - Kiss bass player, went to Richmond College St. George
Earl Slick - Guitarist, Phantom, Rocker and Slick, played with John Lennon
Raekwon - Rapper/Wu-Tang Clan member, although born in Brooklyn he was raised on Staten Island.
Redman - Rapper, lives on Staten Island, his home was featured on MTV Cribs.
Peter Steele - Lead singer and bassist for the gothic-doom band Type O Negative
Kasim Sulton - Bass player for Utopia. Was one of the Blackhearts, from Joan Jett and the Blackhearts. Now is a member of The New Cars
Wu Tang Clan - Hip-hop group; 4 of the 9 are from Staten Island. Credited with giving Staten Island the nickname 'Shaolin'
Adam Vidiksis - Composer. Staten Island native; Monsignor Farrell HS graduate.
Politicians

George Washington" First President-slept overnight in the Poillion Seguine mansion in Great Kills.
Daniel D. Tompkins - The sixth Vice President of the United States, an entrepreneur, jurist, Congressman, Governor of New York, and established Tompkinsville in Staten Island and the Staten Island Ferry.
[Aaron Burr] The third {Vice President of the United States] Burr died on Staten Island at a hotel in the village of Port Richmond. Famous for duel with Alexander Hamilton.
Vito Fossella - Republican member of the New York City Council and United States House of Representatives.
Giuseppe Garibaldi - 19th century Italian revolutionary and statesman, lived for a time on Staten Island, and worked as a candle-maker.[1]
Caleb Lyon - A noted lecturer, poet, author, writer, and politician, he designed the Seal of the State of California. He served in the New York State Assembly, the New York State Senate, the U. S. House of Representatives, and later served as Governor of the Territory of Idaho.[4]
Guy Molinari - Republican member of the New York State Assembly and the United States House of Representatives. He was also Borough President of Staten Island from 1989-2001.
James Oddo - Republican member of the New York City Council.
Robert Straniere - Republican member of the New York State Assembly. He also ran for the United States House of Representatives in 2008..

Sports

Mary Ewing Outerbridge -importer of the game of Tennis to the United States. Tennis first played in St George at the SI Cricket Club. She played tennis in Bermuda and returned to set the 1st court in the usa. First national tournament held on Staten Island.
Joe Andruzzi - Cleveland Browns Offensive Lineman. Has 3 Super Bowl rings with the New England Patriots.
Nicky Anosike - Former NCAA basketball player for the University of Tennessee and current member of the Minnesota Lynx
Teddy Atlas - Boxing trainer and fight commentator. Trained Michael Moorer and Mike Tyson. Winner of the Sam Taub Award for excellence in boxing broadcasting journalism
Rich Aurilia - All Star Shortstop, San Francisco Giants grew up on Staten Island.
Renaldo Balkman - New York Knicks 2006 First Round Draft Pick, Born on Staten Island
George Bamberger - a baseball player and manager. He spent most of his playing career pitching in the Minor Leagues. He spent only three seasons in the Major Leagues with the New York Giants (1951-1952), and with the 1959 Baltimore Orioles. He had a record of 458–478 as manager of the Milwaukee Brewers (1978-1980, 1985-1986) and the New York Mets (1982-1983). Bamberger as a pitching coach for the Baltimore Orioles would teach his famed pitch "The Staten Island Sinker".
Bill Britton - Pro golfer was born and raised on Staten Island. Graduate of Monsignor Farrell High School.
Terry Crowley - baseball player, member of the 1970 World Champion Baltimore Orioles
Jennifer Derevjanik- Plays for the Phoenix Mercury in the WNBA, former St. Peters player
Billy Donovan - coach of the Florida Gators played AAU basketball on Staten island. The team was the Staten Island Stallions.
Frank Fernández - Catcher/Outfielder who played for the Yankees from 1967 to 1969 was nicknamed the "Staten Island Strongboy". Later worked as a long shoreman.
Frank Ferrara - New Dorp H.S., Played for the New York Giants for four seasons and Philadelphia Eagles. Now plays for the Arena team New York Dragons after a stint in the CFL
Silvia Fontana - Italian figure skater in the 2002 and 2006 Winter Olympic Games, was born in Staten Island on December 3, 1976.
Nick Fotiu was the first player ever from New York City (Boro of Staten Island) to play hockey for the hometown New York Rangers.[5]
John Franco - former New York Mets pitcher
Matt Galante - former bench coach for the Houston Astros and New York Mets. Lives in Annadale
Tony Garea - former WWE wrestler, lived in Staten Island for years.
Jim Lee Howell - former head coach of the New York Giants
Rich Kotite - former Philadelphia Eagles and New York Jets head coach, and New York Giants player lives in West Brighton, Staten Island.
Vito LoGrasso - WWE wrestler hails from Staten Island
Dino Mangiero - NFL defensive line for Kansas City Chiefs, Seattle Seahawks, graduated from Curtis High School.
Hank Majeski - MLB infielder. Born and raised in Staten Island
Oleg Maskaev - Heavyweight Boxing Champion
Jason Marquis - All Star starting pitcher for the Colorado Rockies, went to Tottenville High School in Staten Island which he pitched to two city championships.
Kyle McAlarney - Moore Catholic graduate, plays basketball for Notre Dame
Dennis McKnight - Graduated from Susan Wagner H.S. played 9 seasons in the NFL mostly with the San Diego Chargers in the 80's. Now serves as the Special teams and Offensive line coach at the University of Hawaii
Frank Menechino - Susan Wagner H.S., Alabama, 10 seasons MLB most notably for the Oakland Athletics
Sudsy Monchik - 5-Time Pro World Champion racquetball player, went to Tottenville High School.
Adewale Ogunleye - Chicago Bears Defensive End, formerly played for Indiana University and Tottenville High School
Pro Bowlers Johnny Petraglia and Mark Roth both resided in Staten Island.
Joe Pignatano - former Brooklyn Dodgers catcher and New York Mets coach. lived in New Dorp for years.
Bill Richmond - British pugilist, born a slave on colonial Staten Island, lived in the 18th and 19th centuries.
Randy Savage - former Professional wrestler known as "Macho Man" now resides in Staten Island
Mike Siani - standout wide receiver for Villanova and number 1 draft choice for the Oakland Raiders was born and raised on Staten Island.
William Shakespeare (football) - Halfback at Notre Dame and member of College Football Hall of Fame
Bobby Thomson - former Major League Baseball outfielder
John Verderosa -boxer, nicknamed "The Heat"
Mookie Wilson - New York Mets outfielder lived on Staten Island
John Wolyniec - forward for MLS side Red Bull New York
Writers

William T. Davis - naturalist, entomologist, and historian.
Langston Hughes - Poet, lived and worked for a season on a Staten Island farm growing vegetables.
William James, the philosopher, and his younger brother Henry James, the novelist - Spent a few summers on Staten Island when they were growing up in Manhattan.
Ki Longfellow - Novelist, born on Staten Island.
Edwin Markham - poet, lived on Staten Island.
Andy Milligan - Playwright and film director, resided in Staten Island.
Kafū Nagai - Japanese author wrote about his brief residence in American Stories
Theodore Sturgeon - Science fiction author, born on Staten Island.
William J. Taverner - Sex educator, author of texts in human sexuality, and co-editor of the American Journal of Sexuality Education grew up on Staten Island.
Henry David Thoreau - Spent his longest time away from Concord, Massachusetts on Staten Island in the 1840s. While on the island, he tutored the children of Judge William Emerson and penned several letters to Ralph Waldo Emerson. Emerson himself spent a significant amount of time on the island as well.
John Taddeo -writer, director born and raised in Staten Island
Lara Vapnyar - Russian Jewish emigre writer known for her short stories.
Paul Zindel - Novelist and playwright, whose books usually took place on Staten Island.
Melissa Anelli - Webmistress of The Leaky Cauldron and author of Harry, A History: The True Story of a Boy Wizard, His Fans, and Life Inside the Harry Potter Phenomenon
""Notorious""

Paul Castellano - Gambino Crime Boss, lived in the Todt Hill, Staten Island Buried in Moravian Cemetery in unmarked grave.
Sammy "The Bull" Gravano - mob turncoat lived on Staten Island
Historical notables

Dorothy Day - An American social activist and anarchist who converted to Catholicism. She was baptized on Staten Island and lived there for many years. She is the founder of The Catholic Worker newspaper and Houses of Hospitality. She was buried in Resurrection Cemetery on Staten Island.
Ichabod Crane, a Colonel in the US Army during the War of 1812 and the nominal inspiration for the fictional protagonist in Washington Irving's Legend of Sleepy Hollow, who is buried in Staten Island, New York
Thomas D Doubleday- Wall Street Merchant, Colonel in Civil War. He lived in Port Richmond and formed the 4th Heavy Artillery Regiment. Brother of General Abner Doubleday. The Regiment trained at Port Richmond. The regiment was in charge of cannons defending Washington DC. Buried in the Staten Island Cemetery.
Judge William Emerson, brother of poet Ralph Waldo Emerson, resided on what is now known as Emerson Hill.
James Smith Bush - minister at a church in West Brighton . President George H W Bush's great grandfather.
Cornelius Vanderbilt - 19th century shipping and railroad magnate and patriarch of the Vanderbilt family, was born, and lived most of his life on, Staten Island. He is buried in the family vault in the Moravian Cemetery at New Dorp on Staten Island. He was the richest man in america when he died.
Julia Gardiner Tyler second wife of President John Tyler/former first lady resided in Staten Island as a Confederate refugee during the civil war
""Recent Notables""

Marcia Clark - Famed Prosecutor, was involved in the famous O.J. Simpson trial, graduated from Susan E. Wagner High School.
Pat Robertson- TV Evangelist -Christian Broadcast Network - lived in Great Kills in the 1960s , worked as a businessman. Found his interest in religion while living on S.I. and left to become a minister.
Fred Espenak - NASA scientist, born and educated on Staten Island.
Patti Hansen - Famous model and wife to The Rolling Stones' Keith Richards
Sukanya Krishnan - Home Delivery host and news anchor for WB11 Morning News grew up on Staten Island and graduated from New Dorp High School.
Michael Rees - Famed student of the Kogod School of Business at American University in Washington, DC, was born and raised on Staten Island.
Jonathan M. Parisen - Filmmaker, was born and raised on Staten Island
Joe Pistone - FBI agent aka Donnie Brasco lived in Staten Island for a brief period.
Robin Quivers - radio personality from the Howard Stern show lives on Staten Island
Kevin Rooney - former manager of Mike Tyson lived on Staten Island
[edit] References
^ a b c d Cohen, Patricia. "He Sings the Borough Forgotten", The New York Times, June 26, 2007. Accessed October 18, 2007. "Austen isn’t the only famous islander, Mr. Matteo notes. Christina Aguilera was born here; Steven Seagal and Paul Newman lived here, as did the exiles Garibaldi and Santa Anna"
^ Wilson, claire. "Living In | Rosebank, Staten Island: A Quiet Slice of New York Waterfront", The New York Times, March 12, 2006. Accessed November 3, 2007. "In July, the same group holds a picnic and concert with an 18-piece band on the grounds of Clear Comfort, the former home, now a museum, of Alice Austen, a native Staten Islander who was a pioneering female photographer."
^ Newington-Cropsey Foundation website
^ infoplease.com - Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1771-Present
^ Klein, Jeff Z.; and Reif, Karl-Eirc. "hockey: sunday shootout; The Empire Skate: New York Producing Players", The New York Times, May 6, 2007. Accessed October 9, 2007. "In the past, the best players to come out of New York State tended to be products of playground roller hockey in New York City: Joey and Brian Mullen of Hell's Kitchen, and Nick Fotiu of Staten Island."
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_people_from_Staten_Island"
Categories: People from Staten Island | Lists of people by U.S. cities
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Tuesday, September 22, 2009

School Visiit Questions- EDSE 670

School Visit Questions

Assignment: (slightly different from the syllabus) Students please select two (2) to of the following questions to take back to your school/organization for an interview. You should interview, depending on the question, a special education teacher, one to one para-professional, a guidance counselor or school social worker, or someone on the School Based Support team. Each question/interview must be typed.

Questions

1. Discuss the requirements for keeping confidentiality of students with disabilities and their families.
2. Identify the needs of students with emotional behavior disorders and specific techniques used to teach these students.
3. Describe alternative assessments and standardized instruments in the development of curriculum for students with disabilities.
4. Discuss why knowing the background information for students with disabilities is so important. (this includes: medical, family history, and academic history).
5. Describe the techniques used for instructional planning in the following inclusive models: push-in, co-teaching.
6. Describe appropriate collaborative techniques for positive and effective functioning of classroom para-professionals.
7. Discuss effective behavior management techniques appropriate to the need of students with special needs.
8. Discuss an appropriate learning environment for students with disabilities.
9. Give an account of the development, implementation and evaluation of a FBA (Functional Behavior Assessment)
10. Discuss the support you receive for your colleagues, administration or district in regards to working with student with special needs.

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

Fw: School Reading 1-

Week 1 - Assignment (09/20/2009)

Reading Course

 

Week 1 - Assignment (09/20/2009)

  Instructions  Read Textbook Chapters 1. . 

principles for guiding literacy

 

 

stages of Literacy development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Week 2 - Assignment (10/04/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 2.

Weekly Papers - 2 Questions

Reflection Questions:

1. What is the role of the teacher in the classroom ?

 

2. What are the benefits and value of a 'Read-Aloud' ?

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 2 - Assignment (10/04/2009)

 

the role of the teacher in the classroom

 

benefits and value of a 'Read-Aloud'

 

  Week 3 - Assignment (10/11/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 3 - Weekly Papers - 1 Question

 

Reflection Question:

1. Choose two non-fiction books for children and identify the expository structures of each. Then decide on the best strategy for activating prior knowledge for each and give your rationale.

Please click on the link below to submit your assignment. >> View/Complete Assignment: Week 3 - Assignment (10/11/2009)

    Week 4 - Assignment (10/18/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 4. Weekly Papers - 2 Questions

Reflection Questions:

1. What is 'reciprocal' teaching? (Focus on procedures & possible uses).

2. List the seven strategies that help to construct meaning. Give an example of each strategy.

'reciprocal' teaching?

seven strategies that help to construct meaning

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 4 - Assignment (10/18/2009)

 

  Week 5 - Assignment (10/25/2009) Read Textbook Chapters 5.  Weekly Papers - 2 Questions

 

Reflection Questions:

1. What are the elements that lead to successful independent reading?

 

2. What are the components of a balanced literacy program? Briefly explain each component.

Please click on the link below to submit your assignment.

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 5 - Assignment (10/25/2009)

  Week 5 - Reaction Paper 10/25/2009)

Please read the article on the following website and write a reaction paper no longer than 2 pages (double spaced).

Website :http://edwize.org/decoding-grammar

> 

> View/Complete Assignment: Week 5 - Reaction Paper 10/25/2009

  Week 6 - Assignment (11/01/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 6 & 7 .

Weekly Papers - 4 Questions

 

Reflection Questions:

 

1 How do students acquire vocabulary?

 

2. What are the elements of effective vocabulary development? .

 

3. How would students respond to literature? Describe the categories.

 

4. Describe the procedures that promote responding to literature.

 

Please click on the link below to submit your assignment.

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 6 - Assignment (11/01/2009)

 

  Week 7: Assignment (11/08/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 8 & 9.

 

Weekly Papers - 4 Questions

Reflection Questions:

1 Explain, giving at least 5 reasons, why reading and writing have to be taught together ?

 

2. What is the difference between remediation and intervention? How does this difference change the way instruction is planned and carried out?

 

3. Distinguish between the strategies and skills the classroom teacher needs to teach to struggling readers and those required to be taught to all students, including struggling readers. How would one change the way a required skill or strategy is taught to a group of struggling readers?

 

4. Review the 2 levels of text needed for struggling readers; grade level and developmentally appropriate. How can a classroom teacher provide instruction for struggling readers in each of these types of text?

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 7: Assignment (11/08/2009)

  Week 8: Assignment (11/15/2009) Read Textbook Chapters 10. Weekly Papers - 3 Questions

Reflection Questions:

1 What are the guidelines for organizing and managing a balanced literacy classroom?

2. Why do teachers need to use leveled/developmentally appropriate books for the students in their class?

3. Why is it important for teachers to keep records of every student in the class?

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 8: Assignment (11/15/2009)

  Week 9: Assignment (11/29/2009)

Read Textbook Chapters 11.

Weekly Papers - 2 Questions

Reflection Questions:

1 What is assessment? How does it relate to evaluation? Describe.

2. Describe a formal and informal assessment.

>> View/Complete Assignment: Week 9: Assignment (11/29/2009)

 

  Final Paper - Literacy Lesson (12/06/2009)

Prepare a literacy lesson, complete with mini lessons as per text book. You should report the development, application, and analysis of one or several lessons/activities to teach a literacy lesson. Describe why those activities/lessons can help students to develop literacy skills and construct meaning. To support your rationale, use references from what you have learned in the course and from other sources in the APA format. Discuss each activity, if you have more than one, in detail.

Your lesson must include the description of:

a. The target population the characteristics of the learners for whom the activity is planned.

b. The prerequisites (if necessary), the specific objective(s) of the activity, and the content and language standards to which they relate. If you are not a classroom teacher, specify the output expected from this activity.

c. The role of the teacher and the students.

 

d. The resources, materials, and other elements that will be used to create a learning environment that addresses the needs of the population.

 

e. List the principles of learning or the standards and all the references used to develop the lesson.

>> View/Complete Assignment: Final Paper - Literacy Lesson (12/06/2009)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Instructions 
Read Textbook Chapters 1.

Weekly Papers - 2 Questions

Reflection Questions:

1. What are the principles for guiding literacy ? Please explain.

2. What are the stages of Literacy development?

Please click on the link below to submit your assignment.


----- Forwarded Message ----
From: Neil Winchel <neil.winchel@verizon.net>
To: neil winchel <neil.winchel@verizon.net>
Sent: Wednesday, September 9, 2009 12:49:54 PM
Subject: School Readding 1

Chapter 1: Lecture Notes
FOCUS ON LITERACY LEARNING

Chapter Overview:

Standards are serving as the basis for schools throughout the country to develop comprehensive literacy programs. The emphasis is on differentiated instruction that focuses on the needs of individual learners.

Literacy involves all of the communication and calculation skills needed to survive in today's world. This text focuses on the communication aspects of literacy-listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking. Viewing is a form of literacy in which the individual applies communication skills to watching a movie or a television program.

Oral language (listening and speaking) is the foundation of all literacy learning. Reading and writing build on listening and speaking. Thinking is an integral part of all of these processes.

As students develop literacy, they go through several stages or phases-Early Emergent Literacy, Emergent Literacy, Beginning Reading and Writing, Almost Fluent Reading and Writing, and Fluent Reading and Writing. Students do not progress through these stages smoothly, and there is much overlap between the stages.

Standards are statements of what is expected or valued in a given area. Benchmarks are statements of behaviors that would indicate whether a student has achieved a given standard. Standards and benchmarks are becoming increasingly more important in education at the national, state, and local levels. They form the foundation for all instruction and assessment.

All classrooms are diverse classrooms, containing English Language Learners, learning-disabled students, gifted students, and so forth. There is strength in this diversity. Technology plays an increasingly more important role in helping us meet the needs of all learners.

Over the last sixty years, literacy learning has gone through many phases. Knowing about these phases helps us better understand what we do currently and see how and why we have arrived at a more balanced approach to instruction.

Four principles should guide all literacy instruction:


1. Reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing,
and thinking develop simultaneously as learners
develop literacy.


2. The foundations of all literacy learning are oral
language, prior knowledge, and background
experiences.


3. Effective literacy instruction must include a
combination of systematic, explicit, direct
instruction and other types of activities which
support literacy learning.


4. Literacy instruction should be differentiated to
meet the diverse needs of every student.


IMPORTANT TERMINOLOGY

Benchmarks
Differentiated instruction diversity
Explicit instruction
Fluency
Literacy
Stages of literacy development standards

Adapted from Cooper, J.D. & Kiger, N.D. (2000). Literacy: Helping Children Construct Meaning. 6th Edition. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company. Copyright 2006.